Brain Bugs

Series of books for Dean Buonomano ✓ Brain Bugs  ✓ hierarchy ☆ New Life – johndore.co.uk
  • Hardcover
  • 310 pages
  • Brain Bugs
  • Dean Buonomano
  • English
  • 01 May 2018
  • 0393076024

About the Author: Dean Buonomano

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Brain Bugs book, this is one of the most wanted Dean Buonomano author readers around the world.


Brain Bugs A lively, surprising tour of our mental glitches and how they arise.With its trillions of connections, the human brain is beautiful and complex than anything we could ever build, but it s far from perfect Our memory is unreliable we can t multiply large sums in our heads advertising manipulates our judgment we tend to distrust people who are different from us supernatural beliefs and superstitions are hard to shake we prefer instant gratification to long term gain and what we presume to be rational decisions are often anything but Drawing on striking examples and fascinating studies, neuroscientist Dean Buonomano illuminates the causes and consequences of these bugs in terms of the brain s innermost workings and their evolutionary purposes He then goes one step further, examining how our brains function and malfunction in the digital, predator free, information saturated, special effects addled world that we have built for ourselves Along the way, Brain Bugs gives us the tools to hone our cognitive strengths while recognizing our inherent weaknesses. Download Brain Bugs – johndore.co.uk

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10 thoughts on “Brain Bugs

  1. Sean says:

    I think I was the wrong audience for this book It wasn t that it was terrible, but as one with a science background and a long interest in how the brain works, there wasn t any new information here It didn t help that the book reads like a fake textbook in the same way that Jon Stewart is fake news It s not that there isn t actual information there, but it s not a citable source Some kind of narrative framework would have done this book a world of good I like a great many non fiction works, I think I was the wrong audience for this book It wasn t that it was terrible, but as one with a science background and a long interest in how the brain works, there wasn t any new information here It didn t help that the book reads like a fake textbook in the same way that Jon Stewart is fake news It s not that there isn t actual information there, but it s not a citable source Some kind of narrative framework would have done this book a world of good I like a great many non fiction works, but the best ones still have a narrative that is used to present the information being conveyed Instead it was just a dry lets talk about neurons , next chapter lets talk about synapses , next chapter lets talk about neurons AND synapses Sure, there were little quips about observed human behaviors that can be directly correlated to the ways in which it is currently understood that the brain is wired,...

  2. Bettie☯ says:

    travelling mp3, new car and an open roadDescription A lively, surprising tour of our mental glitches and how they arise.With its trillions of connections, the human brain isbeautiful and complex than anything we could ever build, but it s far from perfect Our memory is unreliable we can t multiply large sums in our heads advertising manipulates our judgment we tend to distrust people who are different from us supernatural beliefs and superstitions are hard to shake we prefer inst travelling mp3, new car and an open roadDescription A lively, surprising tour of our mental glitches and how they arise.With its trillions of connections, the human brain isbeautiful and complex than anything we could ever build, but it s far from perfect Our memory is unreliable we can t multiply large sums in our heads advertising manipulates our judgment we ten...

  3. Amir says:

    This book depicts a decent picture of our brains associative architecture which has been developed through millions of years of evolution and natural selection The book explains numerous mechanisms of the brain that in the course of evolution were developed to protect and further help the survival of human beings but the very same mechanisms now are the source of many of our flaws in decision making and susceptibility to various exploits.The downside to the book was first As far as I m concern This book depicts a decent picture of our brains associative architecture which has been developed through millions of years of evolution and natural selection The book explains numerous mechanisms of the br...

  4. Bryna Kranzler says:

    We all know that our brains play tricks on us if you have any doubt of this, just watch some Ted videos that give dramatic examples of this But Dr Buonomano s excellent, lighthearted and very accessible book provides cogent examples of how and why our brains perform the tricks on us that they do, and how we often benefit One of the first examples Buonomano cites is in his explanation of how the brain edits and censors much of the the information it feeds the conscious mind in much t...

  5. Brian Clegg says:

    There are far too many popular science books around about emotions and pleasure and goodness knows what, so it might seem that the whole idea of writing about brain related issues has got a bit tired and then along comes Brain Bugs, which is an absolute delight to read and truly fascinating.Dean Buonomano identifies the places where the brain gets it wrong, either because of technical probl...

  6. Ed Smiley says:

    Very readable Many books on the brain spend a lot of time on brain physiology which gets really esoteric for the layperson, and many fundamentals get lost However Dean Buonomano discusses basics for how our thinking is composed, associatively, of neural networks and synapses On the basis of Hebb s law popularly described as wired together fire together and a few other considerations, such as that brain architecture is evolutionarily based, he is able to describe the foundations of a whole Very readable Many books on the brain spend a lot of time on brain physiology which gets really esoteric for the layperson, and many fundamentals get lost However Dean Buonomano discusses basics for how our thinking is composed, associatively, of neural networks and synapses On the basis of Hebb s law popularly described as wired together fire together and a few other considerations, such as that brain archit...

  7. John Martindale says:

    In writing a review I often find it most difficult to be verbose concerning books that I agree with and thus most of my favorite books don t contain reviews But when I differ with an author, boy, my fingers get to typing Please forgive me as I pontificate.I am quite put off by religious fundamentalist who assume they and their own alone have a perfectly objective grasp of Truth, and yet at the same time are utterly oblivious to their unsupported presuppositions, assumptions and circular reason In writing a review I often find it most difficult to be verbose concerning books that I agree with and thus most of my favorite books don t contain reviews But when I differ with an author, boy, my fingers get to typing Please forgive me as I pontificate.I am quite put off by religious fundamentalist who assume they and their own alone have a perfectly objective grasp of Truth, and yet at the same time are utterly oblivious to their unsupported presuppositions, assumptions and circular reasoning They are completely unaware that they interpret what they...

  8. Prof X says:

    Though many points in the book are interesting, the book suffers from several serious flaws.First is Buonomano s insistence that everything humans do be explained exclusively in terms of stories about what must have, or at least might have, led our ancestors to live longer and thus be able to havesex The telling of such stories is, evidently, what doing science amounts to these days, in some disciplines.The reduction of everything to the amount of sex our great, great, great,grea Though many points in the book are interesting, the book suffers from several serious flaws.First is Buonomano s insistence that everything humans do be explained exclusively in terms of stories about what must have, or at least might have, led our ancestors to live longer and thus be able to havesex The telling of such stories is, evidently, what doing science amounts to these days, in some disciplines.The reduction of everything to the amount of sex our great, great, great,great grandparents, further, is not only kind of crude, but ultimately unsatisfying as an explanation of anything It s like explaining why a billiard ball rolled...

  9. Steven Turek says:

    The information in the book was interesting, but there were points that got a little too condescending for my taste Apparently if you are in any way spiritual or religious, you are a primitive yokel who needs to look to science for answers rather than have faith Apparently the draw to believe in somethingpowerful than yourself is a flaw in your brain that you need to overcome That being said, the majority of this book is good The author is able to provide a myriad of research to back u The information in the book was interesting, but there were points that got a little too condescending for my taste Apparently if you are in any way spiritual or religious, you are a primitive yokel who needs to look to science for answers ra...

  10. Christopher says:

    This was a very interesting and informative book The author draws on and provides detailed references to a wide variety of research on how our brains work, and specifically, how they are wired He points out specific ways that our brains have not caught up to the complex decisions that our modern society call for and why we often m...