The Passion Flower Massacre

The Passion Flower Massacre PDF Ì The Passion  PDF \
  • Paperback
  • 304 pages
  • The Passion Flower Massacre
  • Nicola Morgan
  • English
  • 22 February 2019
  • 0340877340

About the Author: Nicola Morgan

Is a well known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Passion Flower Massacre book, this is one of the most wanted Nicola Morgan author readers around the world.


The Passion Flower Massacre✻ [EPUB] ✰ The Passion Flower Massacre By Nicola Morgan ❅ – Johndore.co.uk Eighteen year old Matilda longs for freedom, to escape from her over protective parents and the pain of her brother s death Working on a farm in the idyllic countryside seems to offer the perfect oppo Eighteen year old Matilda longs for freedom, to escape from her over protective parents and the pain of her brother s death Working on a farm in the idyllic countryside seems to offer the perfect opportunity Paradise, in fact But is it too perfect Perhaps she should be suspicious of the nicer than nice people who run the farm, but Matilda doesn t care She willingly lets herself be drawn in by the warmth they seem to offer, The Passion PDF \ longing to be loved and understood She doesn t want to question, or think, or worry But these people have a shocking plan By the time Matilda realizes it, will it be too late A dramatic new novel of faith, forgiveness, and retribution by the author of Fleshmarket aAmerican Library Association Best Book for Young Adults.

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10 thoughts on “The Passion Flower Massacre

  1. Tom O’Connell says:

    At its heart, The Passionflower Massacre is a mystery novel with intelligent, young adult friendly sensibilities On this level, it succeeds utterly and entirely Told from different perspectives on two concurrent timelines, the novel centres around an insidious religious cult whose operation masquerades as a working fruit farm Because of the novel s shifting perspectives, we are privy to most of the situations before they unfold Occasionally we re even two steps ahead of the characters, but i At its heart, The Passionflower Massacre is a mystery novel with intelligent, young adult friendly sensibilities On this level, it succeeds utterly and entirely Told from different perspectives on two concurrent timelines, the novel centres around an insidious religious cult whose operation masquerades as a working fruit farm Because of the novel s shifting perspectives, we are privy to most of the situations before they unfold Occasionally we re even two steps ahead of the characters, but it works well It s an interesting device, and it s expertly employed.Author, Nicola Morgan, keeps her cards close to her chest, weaving into the narrative a genuine sense of mystery I m a reader who likes to try to guess plot revelations in advance it s not easy to pull the wool over my eyes Passionflower s ending genuinely surprised me I feel that s a huge compliment.There were things that irked me about the characters as I was reading, but these made a certain kind of sense once I d completed it I guess what I m trying to say is that the resolution made me appreciate it on a whole other level The apathetic protagonist lulled me into false expectations I fully believed I had the book figured out, so when things wrapped up my expectations were left doubled over on the floor Considering how many books are let down by weak conclusions, this was a nice surprise.Now, stand back, I m going to need room to vent.While I was reading, I was partially blinded by my hatred of the main character, Matilda To say she grated on me would be putting it mildly In my opinion, she was the book s biggest detractor put simply, I found her constant whining woeful.I haven t read a lot of Young Adult literature but, in what I have read, I ve noticed one common thread irritating teenage leads This is no fault of the genre or anything I understand that teenagers themselves are inherently self absorbed It s a confusing time, and a staple of their development I get it.However, having emerged from teenagerdom some time ago, I find it s principally what turns me off about the genre It doesn t stop me from dipping a toe in the YA pool now and then, but I m certain I don t fit neatly into the intended demographic I m saying this because it s my way of acknowledging that my dislikes aren t necessarily faults Anyway, I digress So, while I was reading this book, I was repeatedly reminded by my partner a lover of YA that my gripes with Matilda were probably biased and unfounded Basically, her argument was that I don t understand the minds of teenage girls This is probably true It could be that Matilda s character is an accurate depiction of a confused adolescent girl I may never understand that, but I do understand how readers like myself need a relatable, sympathetic main character if they re to invest their emotions in a character s journey.So, Matilda At the novel s opening, Matilda an eighteen year old city slicker leaves the comfort of home life hoping to find something better What exactly is wrong with her privileged existence is never really made clear I suppose it s that her parents have neglected her, throwing themselves into their work instead of dealing with their bucketload of issues.Matilda s parents don t pay her enough attention because they re still grieving over the sudden loss of their other child Matilda s younger brother many years earlier.This grief angle was sound, but it was never really explored in all that much depth If her parents were as self motivated as Matilda tells us they are, how come they are texting and calling her seven times a day They worry their brains out over Matilda s wellbeing, while Matilda sits there and tells us that they don t really care.As I said, this family tragedy angle was sound, but I took it as kind of a crutch, a way to rationalise how aloof and unsocial Matilda was Interestingly, Morgan describes Matilda s depression as something visual, something that strengthens and abates depending on the outside situation Matilda describes her sorrow as a sort of blanketing shadow Throughout the novel, she is consciously trying to look away from the shadows and find the light This, I quite liked It was poetic and suggested that, while she wasn t dealing with her own pain, she wasn t actively wallowing in it either Anyway, I understood her shaky symptoms of depression , but they didn t quite justify her poor attitude.So Matilda conceives of leaving home and enjoying a summer of reinvention a summer of boys, suntans, and carefree fruit picking Fruit picking to anyone who hasn t read Grapes of Wrath sounds very romantic and fanciful, and because of this Matilda even manages to rope in her smitten pals, John and Cally Away they go, the future looking bright.As soon as they arrive, though, Matilda is already finding fault with everything She prematurely decides she hates farm life before even giving it a serious go Why do I have to pick gooseberries I only want to pick strawberries she laments, before later complaining that strawberry picking is too uncomfortable She makes quick, harsh assessments of all her employers and alienates everyone except the similarly delinquent stoner love interest If I were her employer all hidden agendas aside , I would not want such a high maintenance complainer on my staff.It really felt like Matilda took her job not to earn money or experience something new, but to satisfy some desperate need for attention acceptance When she realises this is unrealistic, she sulks both inwardly and outwardly I assume the aforementioned grief was meant to justify this, but it didn t It just made her extremely unlikeable.On the technical side, the descriptions of fruit picking were really interesting This is something I ve always been curious about, but have never tried Because of my curiosity, I found I was really interested in the book s setting and all the related procedural stuff The greenhouses, for instance, were fascinating The author hits just the right note with her descriptions They are flowery and lush and full of detail, but they never stoop to excess.Actually, the writing as a whole was pretty solid Absorbing and suspenseful, it effectively kept you guessing until quite late in the game The prologue Peter s first section was well handled It established a foreboding tone early on From the beginning, we are two steps ahead of Matilda in that we know right away that something insidious is afoot What we don t know are the particulars of the plan This kept us squirming.One thing that really irked me was Matilda s tendency to reiterate every new bit of information, or plot development, in her own head Often times she d phrase it as a rhetorical question, which was super patronising Were they really just growing fruit in there If that was all that was going on, why did they dress and act so weird Why was this character so different today Could she be hiding something It kind of felt like Morgan didn t trust the reader to follow on their own, so had Matilda hold our hands through it For one thing, it made Matildairritating than she already was, and for another, it spoiled any subtlety those sections of the narrative had going.The flashbacks to Peter AKA Jesus hair were really unsettling These parts were the subtlest, and they engaged me the most Without the limitations of a teenager s psyche, the prose seemed sharper and the themes less explicit It s almost like these parts were written with a different audience in mind I particularly enjoyed the strong sense of impending doom that followed every time Peter was in a scene We even get a glimpse into his past, which was illuminating.The passionflowers themselves were interesting and imaginative What I liked best about their part in Peter s scheme was how eerily plausible it seemed.The prosy descriptions of religious ascension were overdone, but the themes themselves certainly hit home Morgan s own stance on religion didn t seem to come into her narrative, which I really appreciated This book neither condemns nor condones organised religion More as in the example of Matilda it demonstrates how impressionable people whose lives may be unfulfilling use religion to fill a void This, we learn, is an easy thing for predators to exploit.This part of my review could get borderline controversial, but I ll persist In the past, I ve observed the way fanatics invite God into their hearts and subsequently rationalise all of their triumphs and shortcomings so that they fit around those new beliefs I honestly find this sad because it s like those poor people have surrendered a part of their own will With their belief that faith will set them free , they become less accountable for their own decisions They believe everything is a part of fate or God s plan.It s not my place to judge either way, but Matilda is a perfect example of how this can go awry She is seduced by and consequently embraces Peter s cult because it s easier for her to follow and buy into their idea of happiness than to work at creating her own This is Matilda s folly It s why she s so depressive and annoying she needed to be young and impressionable and damaged for Morgan s example to fit in place I wouldn t say that Peter s cult necessarily preys on her weaknesses she is invited, never forced , but I would say that Matilda invites them in because she s tired of feeling alone Though it s bleedingly obvious from the start that Matilda will become embroiled in their plan , it was actually really interesting witnessing her progressive change of heart.One thing I really liked is that it is entirely possible to interpret Matilda s specific submission to religion as her refusal to grow up and take her place in the real world At one point, her farm coworkers the ones who aren t a part of the cult tell her that she needs to stop crying over not making friends This place, they tell her, is for passing through No one there is interested in forging lasting relationships they re there to work hard, make some money, then move on.This is reality, a part of becoming an adult, and it s what Matilda struggles with most You might say she aligns with the cult because she is unwilling to leave her old, childish ways behind The cult members will support her, nourish her though, really, they will just insulate her from the uglier parts of reality they are kind and sympathetic, whereas the real world is often cold Instead of finding her own feet, Matilda becomes enticed by this easy community All she has to do is relinquish her free will, so to speak, and she ll be assured a life without pain.This is my exploration of why Matilda needed to so insufferable for this narrative to work She is a device, one that carries the themes along The conclusion makes it all readily apparent What I initially perceived as a fault detractor was actually a stroke of genius This book its ending, particularly would not have been half as effective had it not starred Matilda.So, while there were a few bumps of frustration along the way, I found I really enjoyed this book TheI think back on it, theI appreciate how well crafted it was

  2. Lari Don says:

    A sunny summer spent fruit picking on a farm filled with friendly teenagers It should be idyllic But a creeping sense of danger is present from the first few pages of this excellent book It s clear from the start that Matilda s summer job isn t going to end well, but you don t know HOW it s not going to end well, which is what adds the suspense There are several different varieties of religion in this book evangelical cults, solid Scottish Sunday worship, and the righteous revenge of the s A sunny summer spent fruit picking on a farm filled with friendly teenagers It should be idyllic But a creeping sense of danger is present from the first few pages of this excellent book It s clear from the start that Matilda s summer job isn t going to end well, but you don t know HOW it s not going to end well, which is what adds the suspense There are several different varieties of religion in this book evangelical cults, solid Scottish Sunday worship, and the righteous revenge of the sinned against and to be honest, none of them come out looking like good lifestyle choices Don t let it put you off strawberries, though

  3. E. Brough says:

    Picked this up in the grown up fiction section of a charity bookshop The prose is simple but very well crafted, and has a conversational, natural style I didn t twig until quite far through that it was a kids book, as it tackles its themes of belonging and tribe, grief and trauma, and deception and manipulation which could be awfully dark material for children s fiction in a compelling way And yet, it manages to be completely appropriate for the age category it is aimed at This is one I wil Picked this up in the grown up fiction section of a charity bookshop The prose is simple but very well crafted, and has a conversational, natural style I didn t twig until quite far through that it was a kids book, as it tackles its themes of belonging and tribe, grief and trauma, and deception and manipulation which could be awfully dark material for children s fiction in a compelling way And yet, it manages to be completely appropriate for the age category it is aimed at This is one I will consider hanging onto for my own hypothetical children to read and talk about some day

  4. Rachel says:

    This was an enjoyable book showing how easy it is to be sucked in by people, especially if you are feeling lonely and low about yourself Set on a fruit farm it shows how Mathilda becomes part of a cult and the extremes people will go to rectify and get revenge I feel it was aimed muchtowards the young adult audience which is no bad thing but due to this some of the scarier aspects of being part of a cult and some of theviolent aspects are toned down More information could have bee This was an enjoyable book showing how easy it is to be sucked in by people, especially if you are feeling lonely and low about yourself Set on a fruit farm it shows how Mathilda becomes part of a cult and the extremes people will go to rectify and get revenge I feel it was aimed muchtowards the young adult audience which is no bad thing but due to this some of the scarier aspects of being part of a cult and some of theviolent aspects are toned down More information could have been given about life up in the big white house, along withdetail about the housemates and their feelings The book does make you keep wanting to readand the twist towards the end is an interesting one but it was a quick read that I finished in an afternoon

  5. Soph - Lock&Key says:

    This book is one of those books that lingers in the middle I wanted so much to give this book a higher rating but It just wasnt quite there.This was a surprising book, It brought tears to my eyes and I was gluded to it The problem i had with it was the loop holes Some things just didnt add up and i could not look past that

  6. Serendipity says:

    I read this book about 5 years ago when i was in high school, and I can still remember it It had such an interesting plot line that kept me hooked it s not like something I would usually read, but I really enjoyed it Very memorable

  7. Lily Zheng says:

    Was a tad boring in the beginning but I gotandcurious and loved the twist at the end Almost rated a 5 haha

  8. Sarah says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here One of my favourite books ever I really liked the twist at the end, when it turned out that the lovely little old lady, was actually manipulating the master manipulator love it

  9. Booksdingle says:

    An odd book meant for older teenagers I guess.

  10. Keith Dumble says:

    An original story propped up by some urgent clever writing An original story propped up by some urgent clever writing