Holdfast: At Home in the Natural World

Holdfast: At Home in the Natural World PDF ä At Home
  • Hardcover
  • 184 pages
  • Holdfast: At Home in the Natural World
  • Kathleen Dean Moore
  • English
  • 09 October 2017
  • 1558217800

About the Author: Kathleen Dean Moore

Environmental philosopher Kathleen Dean Moore writes about Home in Epub Ù moral, spiritual, and cultural relationships to the natural world In she founded the Spring Creek Project at Oregon State, which brings together the practical wisdom of the environmental sciences, the clarity of philosophy, and the emotive power of the written word to re imagine humankind s relation to the natural world In addition to her philosophical writing for professional journals, Moore is the author of several books of nature essays, including Wild Comfort The Solace of Nature Riverwalking and The Pine Island Holdfast: At PDF/EPUB ² Paradox, winner of the Oregon Book AwardA graduate of Wooster College , Moore earned her MA and PhD from the University of Colorado, Boulder, in the philosophy of law, with a focus on the nature of forgiveness and reconciliation At Oregon State, she teaches environmental ethics, the philosophy of nature, and a variety of courses for OSU s new master s program in environmental leadership She is also co author of a new Environmental Humanities Initiative, which integrates science and humanities to provide leadership for complex times.


Holdfast: At Home in the Natural World❴Read❵ ➪ Holdfast: At Home in the Natural World Author Kathleen Dean Moore – Johndore.co.uk Riveting, finely crafted essays about family and the natural world, and winner of the Sigurd Olson Nature Writing Award Riveting, finely crafted essays about family and Home in Epub Ù the natural world, and winner of theSigurd Olson Nature Writing Award.

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10 thoughts on “Holdfast: At Home in the Natural World

  1. Robert Ryan says:

    Several essays really stood out which is what I m looking for in reading a book like this something relatable to my experiences The essay the song of the canyon wren described something I ve known my entire life, even as a child, but have never shared nor even knew how to put it into words Moore says it perfectly for me Finding the Real Church in Incoming Tide is momentous and something I ve known for quite awhile and am always trying to share with others through my art and conversat Several essays really stood out which is what I m looking for in reading a book like this something relatable to my experiences The essay the song of the canyon wren described something I ve known my entire life, even as a child, but have never shared nor even knew how to put it into words Moore says it perfectly for me Finding the Real Church in Incoming Tide is momentous and something I ve known for quite awhile and am always trying to share with others through my art and conversation Then too, a couple of hilarious essays about a run in with a moose and my favorite The man with a stump where his head should be

  2. Judy says:

    This is my second time reading this fine essays by one of my favorite local authors Favorite quote When people lock themselves in their houses at night and seal the windows shut to keep out storms, it is possible to forget, sometimes for years and years, that human beings are part of the natural world.

  3. Sylvia Walker says:

    It s taken an unusually long time for me to finish this book, but it s a book to read slowly, and savor The essay on the song of the canyon wren just struck me as so true and lovely As the essays progress, the author s children grow up and leave home, and the sadness and wonder of that rang true as well Not at all sentimental, just very thoughtful.

  4. Sarah Boon says:

    This is one of KDM s better books of essays, largely because they are tethered in the human world, and link to everyday human concerns They re not abstract works about the beauty or wonder of nature in and of itself this is nature as filtered by human experience.

  5. Josephine Ensign says:

    This book is written as a series of very short personal essays Several of them are powerful but very abbreviated as if she cuts off mid sentence, mid thought just as it is getting interesting to the reader.

  6. Tracy says:

    Holdfast opens with a call to pay attention to and honor connections, a call that seems all theurgent as division, disruption, and separation seem to rule the day In a series of essays, Moore offers insightful explorations of connections in ecosystems, in human nature interactions, and in human relationships and how all of these dimensions reflect on each other Most of the essays start with a personal experience, usually in a lake, forest, or other natural setting That experience create Holdfast opens with a call to pay attention to and honor connections, a call that seems all theurgent as division, disruption, and separation seem to rule the day In a series of essays, Moore offers insightful explorations of connections in ecosystems, in human nature interactions, and in human relationships and how all of these dimensions reflect on each other Most of the essays start with a personal experience, usually in a lake, forest, or other natural setting That experience creates a launching point for exploration of larger questions A professor of philosophy at Oregon State University, Moore is adept at wrestling with big questions The opening essay deals with the granddaddy of philosophical questions the purpose of life From the vantage point of a marshy lake at dusk, brought to life through the sounds of the marsh creatures, Moore offers one eloquently simple possible answer that life yearns for nothing so much as to continue to be, to love being alive Other essays address questions such as How can we find a sense of connection when so much in our lives is constantly changing How do our perceptions and memories shape our beliefs and Where do we find the sacred A common theme throughout many of the essays is family, particularly addressing changing relationships between parents and children as the children, and the parents, grow and age.The essays are arranged in three parts, the first and third relating to Connection, and sandwiched in between, a set dealing with Separation The arrangement is helpful, as the essays on Connection tend to behopeful, while the Separation essays aremelancholy I found engaging elements in nearly all of the essays that prompted me to thinkdeeply about the topics being addressed Among my favorites were Howling with Strangers, about finding connections with people and with wolves in a cold, dark night Field Notes for an Aesthetic of Storms, exploring the beauty and the fear bound together in storms and why we find them so compelling, The Song of the Canyon Wren, wondering why the experience of beauty sometimes strikes us with a sense of hollowness, and Incoming Tide, describing an Easter morning on the beach and experiences of holiness.I found that my path and Moore s have a remarkable degree of overlap, with most of the essays rooted in Oregon where I did my PhD and Minnesota my childhood and current home The places Moore talks about are, therefore, near and dear to me That recognition undoubtedly makes the essays evencompelling for me than for people who don t have these places in their blood But the questions and the insights are universal, and the places are described so as to bring them to life even for someone not familiar with them.The reprint edition I read closes with a powerful afterword on Moore s shifting sense of the call of the nature essayist She describes how her sense of purpose has evolved from finding an insight in an experience of nature and explicating that in an essay of the sort in this volume Witnessing the continued destruction of natural places and the planet itself, finding and expressing a love for the world no longer seems sufficient That love has taken on a fierceness and a need to protect, and a drive to seek the words that might turn the tide of destruction I look forward to reading herrecent Great Tide Rising Towards Clarity and Moral Courage in a time of Planetary Change, which seems to be a part of that pursuit

  7. Barbara says:

    I enjoyed this collection of nature essays by Kathleen Dean Moore, but I was a bit jealous, too I wish I had written them Then again, would you ever find me kayaking in the open ocean Camping in the deep woods on the edge of a river Watching an sea storm at dawn No, you would not On the other hand, I might go to an event where I could hear wolves howl or volunteer to teach in the only place like this In her last essay, she compares the nature essayist to an osprey, who might catch hold I enjoyed this collection of nature essays by Kathleen Dean Moore, but I was a bit jealous, too I wish I had written them Then again, would you ever find me kayaking in the open ocean Camping in the deep woods on the edge of a river Watching an sea storm at dawn No, you would not On the other hand, I might go to an event where I could hear wolves howl or volunteer to teach in the only place like this In her last essay, she compares the nature essayist to an osprey, who might catch hold of something with his talons that he can neither raise nor release it He might be pulled under and drowned Dragged through green water behind the finning fish, the dead osprey s wings slowly spread, and the flight feathers rudder as if the bird were riding light winds She goes on to say that she believes that this is exactly the work of the nature essayist Like the osprey, the essayist pays hungry and patient attention to a particular a particular set of surfaces what the writer sees and hears on a mountain lake or canoe route, or in a sea storm at dawn Meanwhile, she watches avidly for the moment when something below the surface will reveal itself in the shadow it casts And when it does, the essayist s work is to dive for it, to seize the shadow in a strong grip and bring it to light as it thrashes and splashes for its very life

  8. Lois says:

    Her writing reminds me somewhat of that of Loren Eiseley Very open ended she doesn t necessarily give answers to the questions she raises, but uses life experiences to further explore them The chapters are organized into 3 sections Connection, Separation, then Connection again.I loved her description of the song of a canyon wren The song of the canyon wren is the sound of falling water Its bright tones drop off the canyon rim and fall from ledge to ledge a step at a time, sliding down a p Her writing reminds me somewhat of that of Loren Eiseley Very open ended she doesn t necessarily give answers to the questions she raises, but uses life experiences to further explore them The chapters are organized into 3 sections Connection, Separation, then Connection again.I loved her description of the song of a canyon wren The song of the canyon wren is the sound of falling water Its bright tones drop off the canyon rim and fall from ledge to ledge a step at a time, sliding down a pour off, bouncing onto a sandstone shelf, then dropping to the next layer of stone and down again a falling scale, eight tones, a liquid octave of birdsong in the hard, sun cut canyon

  9. Alex Lockwood says:

    Okay but not a patch on Ellen Meloy There is great passion here and subtle writing in much of the book, but Just a bit too breathless, and again like most nature writers totally myopic when it comes to the hypocrisies involved in crying over dying starfish suffering as climate change warms their sea home, and then taking the family home to cook a roast beef dinner, not making the connection with how that dinner via animal agriculture is the main cause of climate change I can t properly resp Okay but not a patch on Ellen Meloy There is great passion here and subtle writing in much of the book, but Just a bit too breathless, and again like most nature writers totally myopic when it comes to the hypocrisies involved in crying over dying starfish suffering as climate change warms their sea home, and then taking the family home to cook a roast beef dinner, not making the connection with how that dinner via animal agriculture is the main cause of climate change I can t properly respect nature writing that professes to love the ecological world when the nature writer s personal practices are so destructive

  10. Wendy Feltham says:

    Kathleen Dean Moore writes beautifully, and her love of the outdoors resonates with me I liked the influence of philosophy in her writing, as she is a professor of philosophy However the influence of Dylan Thomas was at times too much, it sounded just like him This is the second book we ve read in my natural history book club Everyone loved the book Although I enjoyed it, one or two of the essays would have been enough for me I guess it was just too much of the same.