Tales of the Metric System

<Download> ➵ Tales of the Metric System  Author Imraan Coovadia – Johndore.co.uk
  • Hardcover
  • 400 pages
  • Tales of the Metric System
  • Imraan Coovadia
  • English
  • 25 October 2018

About the Author: Imraan Coovadia

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Tales of the Metric System book, this is one of the most wanted Imraan Coovadia author readers around the world.


Tales of the Metric System From A Natal Boarding School In The Seventies And Soviet Spies In London In The Eighties To The 1995 Rugby World Cup And Intrigue In The Union Buildings, Tales Of The Metric System Shows How Ten Days Spread Across Four Decades Send Tidal Waves Through The Lives Of Ordinary And Extraordinary South Africans Alike An Unforgettable Cast Of Characters Includes Ann, Who Is Trying To Protect Her Husband And Son In 1970, And Victor, Whose Search For A Missing Document In 1973 Will Change His Life Forever Rock Guitarist Yash Takes His Boy To The Beach On Boxing Day In 1979 To Meet His Revolutionary Cousin, While Shanti, His Granddaughter, Loses Her Cellphone And Falls In Love Twice On A Lucky Afternoon In 2010 Playwrights, Politicians, Philosophers, And Thieves, All Caught In Their Individual Stories, Burst From The Pages Of Imraan Coovadia S Tales Of The Metric System As It Measures South Africa S Modern History In Its Own Remarkable Units Of Imagination Simple In Concept, Complex In Construction, A Novel Which Is So Much Than The Sum Of Its Parts, One Which Purports To Examine The Randomness Of Life While Delicately Drawing The Eye To The Butterfly Effect Of Individual Acts And Exposing The Interconnected Ness Of People In Pristine Prose And With A Telling Eye For Detail, Tales Of The Metric System Leaves The Reader With A Sense Of Having Undertaken A Journey Through The Familiar Only To Arrive Somewhere Completely New Aminatta Forna, Author Of The Memory Of Love

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10 thoughts on “Tales of the Metric System

  1. Ray Hartley says:

    Tales of the Metric System is based on a simple idea Take 10 days in the life of South Africa spread over the last four decades and tell a personal story that played out on each of the days.But Imraan Coovadia takes that basic structure and weaves a muchcomplex web For one thing the same lives float in and out of stories, the characters changed by the years, shedding their skin to resurface in roles with diminishing moral clarity For another, there is a larger binding story that ties th Tales of the Metric System is based on a simple idea Take 10 days in the life of South Africa spread over the last four decades and tell a personal story that played out on each of the days.But Imraan Coovadia takes that basic structure and weaves a muchcomplex web For one thing the same lives float in and out of stories, the characters changed by the years, shedding their skin to resurface in roles with diminishing moral clarity For another, there is a larger binding story that ties them all together.That larger story, until now almost exclusively the preserve non fiction, is of how people connected to the struggle through a spouse assassinated by the s...

  2. Gerhard says:

    Writing classes warn aspirant writers not to string short stories together in the hope that they end up with a novel Imraan Coovadia, ironically, heads up the creative writing programme at the University of Cape Town in South Africa Not because it is an easy way out, but rather because it is one of the most difficult things a good writer can do successfully, I think.The linkages can be obscure, as in A Possible Life by Sebastian Faulks, which see...

  3. Jason Furman says:

    Somewhere between epic and miniature, Imraan Coovadia s Tale s of the Metric system covers forty years of South African history but does it in intimate portraits of 10 days spread out from 1970 when an activist professor is essentially being blackmailed to 1973 when a young black man loses the pass he needs to 2010 when South Africa triumphantly hosts the World Cup followed by what is essentially an epilogue set in 19...

  4. John Vanderslice says:

    This is a fascinating novel, exceptionally well crafted For the longest time I thought that to call it a novel was a cagily purposeful misnomer It seemed like a mere collection of short stories, all set in South Africa from the year 1970 onward the period in which the metric system took hold in the country Midway through the bo...

  5. Rah-zee-uh says:

    Absolutely brilliant, although I think the book would have been richer and better written without 1995 and 2010, which did not live up to the other chapters.

  6. World Literature Today says:

    This book was featured in the Nota Benes section of the Sept Oct 2016 issue of World Literature Today Magazine.http www.worldliteraturetoday.org 2

  7. Courtney Smith says:

    This book was very interesting It provided some perspectives on Apartheid that aren t normally available It s worth a read

  8. Adri says:

    Meh.

  9. Vivek Bagai says:

    it is compelling and loose at the same time interesting nonetheless.

  10. Megan says:

    Meh Interesting enough As far as too many characters and too many storylines go, this was better done than most.