With God On Our Side: The Rise of the Religious Right in America

!!> Reading ➹ With God On Our Side: The Rise of the Religious Right in America ➱ Author William C. Martin – Johndore.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 464 pages
  • With God On Our Side: The Rise of the Religious Right in America
  • William C. Martin
  • English
  • 11 June 2017
  • 0767922573

About the Author: William C. Martin

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the With God On Our Side: The Rise of the Religious Right in America book, this is one of the most wanted William C. Martin author readers around the world.


With God On Our Side: The Rise of the Religious Right in AmericaThe Rise Of The Religious Right Is One Of The Most Important Political And Cultural Stories Of Our Time To Many, This Controversial Movement Threatens To Upset The Nation S Delicate Balance Of Religious And Secular Interests To Others, The Religious Right Is Valiantly Struggling To Preserve Religious Liberty And To Prove Itself As The Last, Best Hope To Save America S Soul In With God On Our Sidethe First Balanced Account Of Conservative Christians Impact On Post War Politics William Martin Paints A Vivid And Authoritative Portrait Of America S Most Powerful Political Interest GroupAlthough Its Members Now Number Between Forty And Sixty Million People, The Religious Right Has Not Always Carried The Tremendous And Growing Political Clout It Enjoys Today A Hundred Years Ago, Scattered Groups Of Conservative Christians Worked Fervently To Spread The Gospel, But Their Involvement In Politics Was Marginal Early In This Century, However, A Series Of Charismatic And Ambitious Leaders Began Transforming The Movement By The Election Of John F Kennedy As Our First Catholic President, The Religious Right Had Found Its Voice Politics And Religion Began Mixing As Never Before From Richard Nixon S Strategic Manipulation Of Graham S Religious Influence In The S, To Ronald Reagan S Association With Falwell S Moral Majority In The S, To The Christian Coalition S Emergence As A Slick, Sophisticated Political Machine, The Line Separating The Pulpit From The Presidency Became Increasingly Blurred Now, Preachers Such As Graham, Falwell, And Pat Robertson Preside Over Ministries So Vast And Well Organized That Most Politicians Can Ill Afford To Ignore Their Views Or Lose Their VotesIn Recent Years, The Religious Right S Political Influence Has Propelled It Into Spheres Beyond Pure Politics Race Relations, Abortion And Reproductive Rights, School Curricula, The Nature And Role Of The Family Conservative Christians Have Embraced All Of These Socially Charged Issues, And Their Activism Has Irrevocably Altered The Way America Confronts Its Thorniest Problems How Does A Free Society Draw The Line Between Church And State Without Removing Religious Conviction From Public Life What Motivates Individual Americans To Do Battle In The Culture Wars Most Importantly, When Politicians And Religiously Motivated Activists Join Forces, Who Holds The Reins Drawing On Over New Interviews With Key Figures In The Movement, William Martin Brilliantly Captures The Spirit Of The Age As He Explores Both Sides Ofthis Dramatic Debate Written In Conjunction With The Producers Of The Public Television Series Of The Same Name, This Landmark Book Is Essential Reading For All Americans Conservative And Liberal, Fundamentalist And Atheist Who Care About The Spiritual Health And Political Future Of Our Country From The Hardcover Edition

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10 thoughts on “With God On Our Side: The Rise of the Religious Right in America

  1. Eric_W says:

    William Martin, a sociologist at Rice University, wrote this companion piece to a PBS series that I have not seen that surveys the history of the mostly white, Protestant Evangelical church community and its role in the political landscape over the past forty years, with a brief analysis of its roots in the early twentieth century Ironically, it was self professed evangelical and born again Christian Jimmy Carter who raised the ire that coalesced the religious right movement In an attempt to William Martin, a sociologist at Rice University, wrote this companion piece to a PBS series that I have not seen that surveys the history of the mostly white, Protestant Evangelical church community and its role in the political landscape over the past forty years, with a brief analysis of its roots in the early twentieth century Ironically, it was self professed evangelical and born again Christian Jimmy Carter who raised the ire that coalesced the religious right movement In an attempt to force independent schools, many self labeled as Christian schools, to accept non white students, he had urged the IRS to revoke the tax exempt status of any school that was racially segregated Attempts by the religious right for lack of a better term, for as Martin shows, there were often huge gulfs in beliefs among the so called religious opposition to organize followers around issues such as abortion, homosexuality, and other issues had failed on a national level, but when their pocketbook was threatened, they came alive Removal of tax exempt status would have inevitably raised tuition and cast the specter of government control over what they could teach or whom they could admit into their schools, and this was anathema The abortion issue failed to energize the right after Roe v Wade Jerry Falwell did not even preach a sermon on it until 1978 , and the author speculates that a major reason was the right s anti Catholic attitude Anything the Catholics were against might be OK and anything they were in favor of should be mistrusted In general, evangelicals were very worried about JFK s ascendancy to the presidency, fearing he would come under the control of the dreaded pope Billy Graham, a major figure in the evangelical movement, initially courted political figures, becoming good friends with whomever was in power, but especially Richard Nixon It was this association and his shock at Nixon s immorality after listening to the Nixon White House tapes that lead Graham to warn other evangelicals, against mixing religion with politics But power continued to attract a wide group of evangelicals and Jerry Falwell s Moral Majority, ostensibly dismayed by the country s descent into moral turpitude, delivered the election to Ronald Reagan Falwell s star has waned considerably, and he has been replaced by Pat Robertson and Ralph Reed although little of their social agenda has been enacted into law, the Kansas anti evolution textbook stance being perhaps a glaring exception Martin treats all the characters of the movement sympathetically and objectively, although he s not afraid to skewer hypocrisy when it appears, and Jerry Falwell s obvious racism and subsequent dis ingenuousness about it clearly annoy the author It s an important story and well told Clearly, many of the people involved have honest concerns for a variety of issues that disturb them, and Martin delineates all the sides various of battles including the Kanawha County West Virginia textbook war, the disagreement over how AIDS patients should be treated, and the sex education battles of Anaheim, California What I found most disturbing was not the political activism or concern of individuals, but the callous and unprincipled adoption of particular issues by those seeking pure political power There is also a disturbing attitude on both sides of the issue that there is only one right way of looking at the world and, by God, you better look at it my way or else It brings to mind the witch hunts of Salem, the Inquisition, and McCarthy, to mention but a few We must hope and work together so that those periods will never surface again What the evangelicals and religious right fail to recognize is how harmful any relationship with government can be That was the genius of Thomas Jefferson in insisting on a separation of the two Many modern observers have pointed out that religion thrives in this country precisely because there is no official link to whomever is in power Billy Graham recognized this too late as he read how he had been manipulated by Nixon for Nixon s own ends So it s doubly ironic that the only self professed born again Christian president, Jimmy Carter, who recognized the dangers inherent in a political religious alliance, was such a disappointment to those evangelicals who had championed his election

  2. Huyen says:

    I must have feared that God would strike lightening at my neck while I sleep if I didn t finish this book or something, I tried so hard and so miserably to slog through it It is not terrible, but not terribly interesting either I guess I tried so hard because I find reading about how ridiculously people can behave is quite fascinating.I m only vaguely familiar with many of the names in the book which are probably household names to most Americans, like Billy Graham or Jerry Falwell.The book co I must have feared that God would strike lightening at my neck while I sleep if I didn t finish this book or something, I tried so hard and so miserably to slog through it It is not terrible, but not terribly interesting either I guess I tried so hard because I find reading about how ridiculously people can behave is quite fascinating.I m only vaguely familiar with many of the names in the book which are probably household names to most Americans, like Billy Graham or Jerry Falwell.The book contains tons of historical anecdotes and a bit of explanation of the social dynamics that drove the evangelical movement throughout history But the style doesn t appeal to me much, very dry and slightly incoherent.In the end, after spending so long on this book, I decided I d liberate myself from the misery of reading it and accept a roasted neck for my sin But let me tell you what I think of what I ve read so far If there s anything that leaves an impression from this book, it s the utter hypocrisy of a lot of fundamentalist Christians in America Many of them are so paranoid about how a secularist society infringes on their economic and religious freedom which often means taking away the privileges that Christians had long enjoyed for absolutely no rational reason Yet, they go mad at giving others freedom, when it comes to abortion, gays rights, sex education, civil rights, things that usually don t affect them directly apart from hurting their bigoted, self righteous egos and making them lose sleep over the accelerated end of the world.And it seems to be a terrifyingly pessimistic philosophy if it deserves the name at all , there seems to be this constant fear that society is going to collapse, moral values are decaying, patriotism is going down the toilet etc Maybe taking away someone else s freedom saves them from this sense of powerlessness when facing the inevitable end of the world They preach about love, in the very narrow sense of the word, that is love for people like them, white, Christian, family value people Love that does not derive from empathy and our capacity to project suffering on another human being, but from Scripture, which itself a horribly inconsistent and morally questionable text.It s worrying that they have a quite powerful political influence within the American government and among the population perhaps I ll give it the last try with the chapter on the Bush administration I don t know to what extent the Bush administration devised foreign policy based on God s advice, but if that was the case, then it is frightening, because religion shields any claims from rational debate Fundamentalist Christianity seems to have a surviving mechanism that allows it to persist like an insidious disease a sense of community, security, certainty, hope those things help it cover up its morally corrupt deceit my american friends probably know about this much better than me.oh well, so much for Tom Paine s hope that Christianity would go away in 30 years

  3. Lee says:

    Don t love the way it s written, but the content will scare the hell out of you Read Eric Hoffer s True Believer after reading this and look at the nature of mass movements.

  4. Hortensia says:

    Honestly this is one of the most powerful books I read in 2009 I wish everyone I know would read it so we could discuss It was suuuch a page turner So, I don t know where to start, other than to say that it is a wonderful history of the development of the Religious Right, told in very nice, bite sized chapters of close up cases The intro and epilogue, though, are weird and show that either the editor was terrible or the author had no idea who their audience would be Suddenly, at the end of Honestly this is one of the most powerful books I read in 2009 I wish everyone I know would read it so we could discuss It was suuuch a page turner So, I don t know where to start, other than to say that it is a wonderful history of the development of the Religious Right, told in very nice, bite sized chapters of close up cases The intro and epilogue, though, are weird and show that either the editor was terrible or the author had no idea who their audience would be Suddenly, at the end of an extremely powerful book about religion and politics in the 1960s late 80s, we get a little ditty on the constitutional freedom of religion Whaaat I laughed It s like getting served skittles for desert after fillet mignon I recommend this for non historians as well as historians

  5. Aiesha says:

    I am no fan of the evangelical conservative movement but this author William Martin piqued my interest because he presented the information in a muchnonjudgmental manner than I probably could have Definitely an interesting read that shows you how politicized the Religious Right became and some of the tactics they used, rightly or wrongly My only beef with the book is that I expected muchinformation on George W Bush given than his picture is the most pronounced on the cover but a I am no fan of the evangelical conservative movement but this author William Martin piqued my interest because he presented the information in a muchnonjudgmental manner than I probably could have Definitely an interesting read that shows you how politicized the Religious Right became and some of the tactics they used, rightly or wrongly My only beef with the book is that I expected muchinformation on George W Bush given than his picture is the most pronounced on the cover but alas, I got two pages in the afterword that was written years after the book was actually published I will be holding on to this book for a while

  6. Kristina says:

    Excellent history and analysis of the rise of the Christian right I learned quite a bit This book is not written with a political bias the author merely presents the facts and does not comment on them However if you are an atheist reader like myself the book was a horrifying wake up call to the power of religious conservatism.

  7. Mike Edwards says:

    An excellent treatment of perhaps the most important domestic political trend of the last 30 years the rise in political power of evangelicals, and the movement of that huge group towards a steadfast political alliance with the Republican Party.

  8. Kristel says:

    creepy but repetitive

  9. Benjamin Sauers says:

    I find this topic very interesting I think Martin did a good job sketching the movement.

  10. Patrick says:

    An awesome read about the role of religious right in America I thought it was an informative and balance read.