Keeping It Living

[PDF] ✎ Keeping It Living  ⚡ Douglas Deur – Johndore.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 404 pages
  • Keeping It Living
  • Douglas Deur
  • English
  • 17 May 2018
  • 0295985658

About the Author: Douglas Deur

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Keeping It Living book, this is one of the most wanted Douglas Deur author readers around the world.


Keeping It Living The European Explorers Who First Visited The Northwest Coast Of North America Assumed That The Entire Region Was Virtually Untouched Wilderness Whose Occupants Used The Land Only Minimally, Hunting And Gathering Shoots, Roots, And Berries That Were Peripheral To A Diet And Culture Focused On Salmon Colonizers Who Followed The Explorers Used These Claims To Justify The Displacement Of Native Groups From Their Lands Scholars Now Understand, However, That Northwest Coast Peoples Were Actively Cultivating Plants Well Before Their First Contact With Europeans This Book Is The First Comprehensive Overview Of How Northwest Coast Native Americans Managed The Landscape And Cared For The Plant Communities On Which They DependedBringing Together Some Of The World S Most Prominent Specialists On Northwest Coast Cultures, Keeping It Living Tells The Story Of Traditional Plant Cultivation Practices Found From The Oregon Coast To Southeast Alaska It Explores Tobacco Gardens Among The Haida And Tlingit, Managed Camas Plots Among The Coast Salish Of Puget Sound And The Strait Of Georgia, Estuarine Root Gardens Along The Central Coast Of British Columbia, Wapato Maintenance On The Columbia And Fraser Rivers, And Tended Berry Plots Up And Down The Entire CoastWith Contributions From Ethnobotanists, Archaeologists, Anthropologists, Geographers, Ecologists, And Native American Scholars And Elders, Keeping It Living Documents Practices, Many Unknown To European Peoples, That Involve Manipulating Plants As Well As Their Environments In Ways That Enhanced Culturally Preferred Plants And Plant Communities It Describes How Indigenous Peoples Of This Region Used And Cared For Over Different Species Of Plants, From The Lofty Red Cedar To Diminutive Plants Of Backwater Bogs

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10 thoughts on “Keeping It Living

  1. Norris Thomlinson says:

    I m not that well versed in her works, but Nancy Turner has for decades been researching and publishing books on Pacific Northwest cultures and especially ethnobotany I believe most of her work has been in British Columbia, but her books usually cover down to northern California She s on my list of authors to check out .The basic goal of this book is to prove that indigenous peoples in this region were actively cultivating crops prior to European contact Apparently the assumption amongs I m not that well versed in her works, but Nancy Turner has for decades been researching and publishing books on Pacific Northwest cultures and especially ethnobotany I believe most of her work has been in British Columbia, but her books usually cover down to northern California She s on my list of authors to check out .The basic goal of this book is to prove that indigenous peoples in this region were actively cultivating crops prior to European contact Apparently the assumption amongst Europeans since the start, and thus subsequently amongst anthropologists through the 20th century, was that Indian people cultivated a local species of tobacco, harvested and ate and preserved a hell of a lot of salmon, and hunted and gathered a small amount of plant and other animal foods This volume makes the case that plant foods wereimportant than previously realized, and especially that tribes deliberately cared for and cultivated berry patches and root crops.I found the writing rather dry and had to push myself through a lot of the book it s written by anthropologists for other anthropologists to debate fine points of anthropology It s definitely accessible by laypeople, but not written for us per se Not knowing much about anthropology and the details of the debates, I m convinced by its claims, but what do I know Anyway, I was mostly focused on practical applications to modern times The main take home points I got from the book are Read full review

  2. Jennifer says:

    This is what I would consider a very heavy academic book rather than an enjoyable read for the layperson A lot of the ideas were repeated over and over again in excruciating detail If you are of a Phd type mindset for plants it would probably beenjoyable I was hoping for a practical guide on adopting Native American plant medicine into my own current life.

  3. D says:

    I read the intro and a few selected chapters Was interested in gaining practical knowledge and perspective and I gained that Definitely an academic book, but of much interest to the would be forager.