The Book of Margery Kempe

The Book of Margery Kempe Epub ✓ The Book  PDF or
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  • 328 pages
  • The Book of Margery Kempe
  • Margery Kempe
  • English
  • 04 October 2017
  • 0393976394

About the Author: Margery Kempe

The following biography information provides basic facts and of Margery MOBI ☆ information about the life and history of Margery Kempe, a famous Medieval character Nationality EnglishLifespan c cTime Reference Lived during the reign of the English kings Edward III, Richard II and Henry IVDate of Birth She was born Margery Brunham at King s Lynn, Norfolk then called Bishop s Lynn in approximately Family connections She was the daughter of John Brunham, a wealthy merchant in King s Lynn who was involved in local The Book PDF or politics and achieved the position of mayor and Member of Parliament Education Margery Kempe was unable to read or write but had people read to her She dictated her memoirs which were transcribed as The Book of Margery Kempe Married Margery Kempe married John Kempe at the age of twenty in Hence the assumption that she was born in Children Margery and John Kempe produced childrenWhen the visions of Margery Kempe began She experienced her first Christian vision c following Book of Margery Epub à the delivery of her first childWhat provoked the visions of Margery Kempe She was suffering from a disturbed state of mind caused by any number of events including depression post natal , feelings of guilt, an over imaginative mind, a spiritual crisis and an unsympathetic confessorShe suffered the equivalent of a nervous breakdown Her condition was so severe that she had to be constrained It was punctuated by loud and unrestrained cryingShe then experienced a vision and emerged calm and came to her senses Unclear of how she should respond to the visions she continued everyday life with her husband and produced manychildren This was seen as an impossible way of life for a spiritual woman and she was strongly criticised and even rebuked for attempting to live a life totally devoted to Christ but as a married womanIn she and her husband took vows of chastity before the Bishop of LincolnShe then took to wearing white which broughtcriticism as the normal color for a woman of her age and station would have been blackShe annoyed people further by her uncontrollable weeping and wailing at holy sites and during massMargery Kempe was accused of being a Lollard but cleared of this by the Archbishop of CanterburyShe undertook pilgrimages to sacred places in England including Canterbury, Norwich and YorkMargery Kempe was a contemporary of the Medieval anchoress, Julian of Norwich, who she visitedIn the autumn of she undertook a pilgrimage to the Holy Land via VeniceShe reached Jerusalem and visited the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and travelled on to BethlehemShe returned to England in May Further pilgrimages took her to Rome, Germany, Norway and SpainIn she undertook a pilgrimage to DanzigMargery Kempe dictated the content of The Book of Margery Kempe to men hired as scribes The Book of Margery Kempe was recopied by a travelling priestThe manuscript containing the The Book of Margery Kempe was lost for many years and only rediscovered in by Miss Hope Emily Allen, although its existence and some of its contents were known from references and quotations in other medieval booksMiss Hope Emily Allen identified the manuscript copy of The Book of Margery Kempe in the library of Colonel Butler Bowdon of Pleasington Old Hall in Lancashire, EnglandDate of Death The last known reference to Margery Kempe was at King s Lynn in although her exact date of death is unknownMargery KempeThe story and biography of Margery Kempe contains interesting information, facts the history about the life of this Medieval woman of historical importance.


The Book of Margery Kempe[Read] ➲ The Book of Margery Kempe ➺ Margery Kempe – Johndore.co.uk The Book of Margery Kempe c is the extraordinary account of a medieval wife, mother, and mystic Known as the earliest autobiography written in the English language, Kempe s Book describes the dramat The Book of Margery Kempe c is the of Margery MOBI ☆ extraordinary account of a medieval wife, mother, and mystic Known as the earliest autobiography written in the English language, Kempe s Book describes the dramatic transformation of its heroine from failed businesswoman and lustful young wife to devout and chaste pilgrim She vividly describes her prayers and visions, as well as the temptations in daily life to which she succumbed before dedicating herself to her spiritual calling She travelled to the most holy The Book PDF or sites of the medieval world, including Rome and JerusalemIn her life and her boisterous devotion, Kempe antagonized many of those around her yet she also garnered friends and supporters who helped to record her experiences Her Book opens a window on to the medieval world, and provides a fascinating portrait of one woman s life, aspirations, and prayers.

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10 thoughts on “The Book of Margery Kempe

  1. Jan-Maat says:

    Well that was a bit strange.The second thing I would say, is avoid this older edition with it s old translation The editor in fact suggests that the English was only slightly modernised, my general impression, as maybe you can tell from the updates, is the translator produced a weird sounding Tudorbethan style that often comes over as a pastiche It has neither the pleasures of the original, nor the clarity of a modern translation The passages about lice or Margery tormented by visions of na Well that was a bit strange.The second thing I would say, is avoid this older edition with it s old translation The editor in fact suggests that the English was only slightly modernised, my general impression, as maybe you can tell from the updates, is the translator produced a weird sounding Tudorbethan style that often comes over as a pastiche It has neither the pleasures of the original, nor the clarity of a modern translation The passages about lice or Margery tormented by visions of naked men and being told by the devil that all she has to to make it stop is to select which one she will be intimate with first, are rendered particularly obscurely, no doubt out of respect for a 1950s readership who wouldn t want to read such filth But the 50s are over now and we ought to be able to read about people stripping off their clothes on pilgrimage to attack each other s lice freely the fifteenth century wasn t just about the battle of Agincourt after all.The third point is that this is also simply a deeply odd book view spoiler the forth point, in the manner of the crooked man who walked a crooked mile view spoiler who found a crooked sixpence against a crooked style he bought a crooked cat which caught a crooked mouse,and they all lived together in a little crooked house hide spoiler will be that the contents are equally odd hide spoiler This book might be a tremendously rare thing a medieval autobiography, except that Margery was illiterate, people have to read to her throughout the book, it might be ghostwritten, but the book tells us that it was written twice, firstly by a mysterious man and I still suspect that this might have been her son the only one of her sixteen children who is named view spoiler hopefully some of the others survived to adulthood hide spoiler who had spent a long time abroad in the German speaking world as did her son was literate, but in an idiosyncratic way , who undertook nonetheless to write out the story that Margery tells of her life This man dies Margery s son also predeceased her and Margery passes the manuscript on to a priest who can t understand what he wrote at all, we re given the impression that it was written in some weird north sea melange neither English nor German, however after some time, prayer and the intervention of God, the Priest continues with the manuscript It is unclear if he rewrote it and if so if he edited, or reworked the material in any way, his text has come down to us in a mysterious manner, excerpts were published but the complete manuscript first came to light in the 1930s So it is odd, you can decide for yourself if it is an autobiography, biography or something sui generis.One of it s odd features is how depersonalised it is hardly anybody is named, Margery herself is invariably referred to as this creature , her husband is named once and that midway through the book, as I said only one of her sixteen children gets a name, people who help her might be called the good priest or whatever the profession happened to be those who hinder her likewise might be the evil friar view spoiler not someone who owns a chip shop and charges extra for salt and vinegar but of the religious type hide spoiler When the occasional Bishop, or Mayor or Abbot s official is named they leap off the page at the reader Typing, my stomach full of coffee and pancakes, I wonder if this was a deliberate literary decision in imitation of the Gospels in which repeatedly we come across a Centurion , a woman taken in adultery , or a fisherman when presumably all these people had names, but by implication they are irrelevant, it is the role and relationship to the central narrative figure alone which is of significance If so then this is a further way that Margery is a difficult figure for the reader, for all her protestations of humility she s plainly holier than thou, and me This isn t a new feeling, her neighbours seem to have felt the same already in the fifteenth century and they were not always shy in expressing their displeasure, one man pours a bowl of water over her head I did wonder if water was not a fair rendition of the original , and after a hundred pages with Margery one can see why.One of the few people named is Julian of Norwich who Margery goes to visit early in her career of being holy The comparison is a bit unlucky as the two are very different mystics Julian had a series of visions at a precise time in her life that she then contemplated for years before having them set out in writing Revelations of Divine Love, her vision insights are striking and distinctive Margery is very different, she has an ongoing interior dialogue with God the whole trinity and the Virgin Mary, with the occasional vision Her religiosity is characterised by intense emotion, specifically the habit of bursting into tears and screaming for hours at a time, in church services, during open air preaching, at pilgrimage sites, even randomly out in the countryside, this it turns out was a phase, but one which went on for ten years Margery when she began to be holy gave up eating meat, however all her weeping and wailing left her weak, eventually the Virgin Mary appears to her and asks her to start eating meat again just so she can sustain herself in the work of weeping and wailing One of the good things with Margery is that there is no false modesty about her One gets the impression that she was pretty proud and haughty before being holy she was of a fancy well to do family in King s Lynn then Bishop s Lynn a fairly busy port town in eastern England view spoiler I might, if I were polite, describe it as something of a backwater today, in the vernacular I would use a different expression, but then I am not native to that part of the country, and it seems I have my patriotism too hide spoiler , her father was an important prominent citizen, as was her husband once she becomes holy this is evenmarked the Virgin Mary will have her as her servant, while she will become Jesus s lover, and mother, and daughter apparently simultaneously and incestuously , maybe we are meant to understand this in a spiritual sense but it feels pretty physical in her expression, though I understand this isn t so unusual at least in mystical circles view spoiler to which, I confess, I am not privy hide spoiler It seems to me significant that while she has the subordinate role, it is to the very highest spiritual beings in her world.The crying is very interesting, as you can imagine many people who came into contact with Margery found it difficult to cope with, if we are being polite She is accused of being a heretic, specifically a Lollard something which could lead to your being burnt unto death in the England of her time Yet in a way her extreme emotional response is a reasonable reaction to the practise of religion in her day, if you are being told to focus on the awful sufferings of Jesus on the cross, and the unbearable grief of Mary, crying is the least one can do Her contemporaries repeatedly and in many countries found it a bit too much though view spoiler she would have been useful in a drought I feel, hey Margery come stand over my crops and remember how the people beat Jesus , if you wanted to irrigate the Sahara and turn it into a garden you would just have had to introduce her to Friedrich Nietzsche Margery, God is dead , this I think the problem with Margery, it becomes swiftly hard not to poke fun at her, she s a challenge to take entirely seriously, I think if I could cry like her I would go to Church often too, it is pretty subversive to respond so intensely to the message of the religious body that you can stop it from functioning normally hide spoiler.The expression of religion is however always very public, Margery eventually, after the sixteen children, convinces her husband to take a vow of chastity with her, they then have to separate and live apart as no will believe they are chaste if they live under the same roof The husband, a true romantic, only seriously protests when Margery wants to go on pilgrimage Rome, Jerusalem and Compostella then he insists that she pay off his debts first view spoiler possibly debts she had incurred through the failure of the businesses she set up view spoiler proud Margery ultra religious after being a failed serial entrepreneur seems a very modern figure some how hide spoiler hide spoiler.She is also troubled by revelations from God about who is going to die, and once dead if they go to Heaven, Purgatory or Hell She finds this hard to deal with Once or twice there are instances of her knowing things that God told her, some are fairly generalised like suspicion of shysters and frauds, who go on to trick and defraud the gullible Once she convinces a priest that she has true insights from God by telling him what three sins he has committed and hasn t confessed to, the Priest however is not at first impressed, and my lechery he says was it with married or unmarried women after a moments consultation with God married quoth she Is accusing a priest of lechery with married women evidence of a connection with God , a lucky guess, or a reasonably safe deduction, with all due respect to any passing Priests who take their celibacy seriously, I m not sure.Although she goes to a lot of places Rome, Jerusalem, Leicester, London, Lincoln, York, Danzig Gdansk , Prussia, Aachen, Stralsund, Canterbury, Ipswich, Norwich etc There is no interest in them as places, buildings, sites, or their appearance, population, and customs, only in what happens to Margery crying, praying, being abandoned but not by lice having no money, giving away money that belongs to other people So again this is an impersonalised memoir all theto focus on the personal the relationship with God, there really is nothing else other than Margery s interior relationship with God and it s manifestations in the physical realm As with Julian of Norwich, there is not a lot of interest in saint s outside of a narrow group though much a bigger group of saints than Julian s , in Margery s life there is John the Baptist, St Anne, and St Bridget of Sweden although Margery protests that she hath not read her book at first, that reading comes later, despite which there probably was an awareness of her as she visits Rome on the occasion of Bridget s canonisation and meets one of Bridget s servants they have no common language and don t communicate a recurrent theme Bridget significantly was a mother with a second career as a holy woman, like Margery, virginity might have been the ideal but both women break ground in asserting, I don t know how to phrase it maybe, a post virginal sanctity,the potential for an extraordinarily holy life by an everyday ish woman view spoiler ish since Bridget iirc was a noble woman and Margery a well to do townswoman hide spoiler The other saint mentioned is Catherine, I m not sure if this is Catherine as in Catherine wheel or Catherine of Siena, the former would beconventional, the latter an interesting choice a young woman who withdrew from daily life and because of that becamesignificant in the life of her community, again like St Bridget a modern inspiration for Margery if that was the Catherine she referred to.That is Margery, a difficult person to be with, with an intense relationship with the divine Her book even in this foul translation probablyartful than I can recognise A medieval woman who did what she wanted on her own terms and who was much abused for it, she was plainly deeply annoying, but then I guess saints probably mostly are view spoiler though Margery has not been canonised, and being annoying is not I hasten to add the sole criteria for sanctity hide spoiler

  2. Michael says:

    As the first autobiography in English, as well as one of the few extant medieval texts authored by an English woman writer, The Book of Margery Kempe would be of great cultural and historical import even were it not so pleasurable to read Written in the third person, likely as a kind of collaboration between the semi literate author and her male scribe, the Book records the trials and triumphs of Margery Kempe, an orthodox English laywoman, as she travels about the world, encountering adversity As the first autobiography in English, as well as one of the few extant medieval texts authored by an English woman writer, The Book of Margery Kempe would be of great cultural and historical import even were it not so pleasurable to read Written in the third person, likely as a kind of collaboration between the semi literate author and her male scribe, the Book records the trials and triumphs of Margery Kempe, an orthodox English laywoman, as she travels about the world, encountering adversity, facing off against corrupt clergyman, and exhibiting her holiness to her peers often through excessive displays of wailing, which earn her many enemies The book s episodic structure is at once rambling and repetitious Kempe self admittedly made no attempt to recount the events of her life in a linear, cohesive, or comprehensive manner to her scribe, and the Book s myopic focus on tales establishing Kempe s virtue and her special relationship to Christ makes it read as thinly veiled hagiography Interestingly, interspersed throughout Kempe s non chronological narrative are surreal visions, unintentional affronts to social order, and references to the making of the Book as well as its author s intentions In these and many other ways, Kempe s work bizarrely parallels the aesthetic tendencies of the postmodern, though to much different effects I know of few other autobiographical books, medieval or modern, that offer as strange and memorable reading experiences

  3. Mir says:

    My then roommate and I had a class together in which we read this book When a stray cat turned up at our house and insisted on moving in with us, we named her Margery because she whined so much.

  4. John Wiswell says:

    One of the oldest autobiographies in the English language, should you choose to believe the illiterate Margery Kempe truly dictated it, is bitterly funny today Kempe recounts her marriage, failures in business, curiously kinky religious visions, and spuriously selfish pilgrimmage It is at once a window into the biases of a bygone age, and a thinly humorous commentary on the human condition Was she driven mad by trouble childbirth, lying to get ahead in the world, or truly touched The Church One of the oldest autobiographies in the English language, should you choose to believe the illiterate Margery Kempe truly dictated it, is bitterly funny today Kempe recounts her marriage, failures in business, curiously kinky religious visions, and spuriously selfish pilgrimmage It is at once a window into the biases of a bygone age, and a thinly humorous commentary on the human condition Was she driven mad by trouble childbirth, lying to get ahead in the world, or truly touched The Church had its opinion, which is why the book went missing between the 15th and 20th centuries She was a heretic, an entrepreneur, and worst of all for her time, a woman It s hard not to have sympathy for her, or for the people she dragged around.Penguin books translated this edition into modern English to beaccessible for modern readers, and good on them it makes it easier to breeze through if you are so inclined

  5. Netta says:

    I would have been blessfully ignorant of this book if not the remarkable book Sex Before Sexuality A Premodern History that I read earlier Having read The Book of Margery Kempe, I ought to admit that Sex Before Sexuality summed up everything that might be of interest for you in this book in a couple of words, relieveing you from whimpering, sobbing, crying, weeping, moaning, suffering, endless narrative offered by Margery and those who wrote for her I would have been blessfully ignorant of this book if not the remarkable book Sex Before Sexuality A Premodern History that I read earlier Having read The Book of Margery Kempe, I ought to admit that Sex Before Sexuality summed up everything that might be of interest for you in this book in a couple of words, relieveing you from whimpering, sobbing, crying, weeping, moaning, suffering, endless narrative offered by Margery and those who wrote for her

  6. Madeline says:

    After having to read this for my Lit class, and reading a book by St Theresa of Avila two years ago for a history class, I have come to the following conclusion Female mystics are the single most boring, long winded people on the planet Margery Kempe s life had all the potential to be a well made, expensive, but ultimately poorly received religious film from the Mel Gibson canon She had visions, was psychic, and spent most of her adult life traveling across Europe and the Middle East while re After having to read this for my Lit class, and reading a book by St Theresa of Avila two years ago for a history class, I have come to the following conclusion Female mystics are the single most boring, long winded people on the planet Margery Kempe s life had all the potential to be a well made, expensive, but ultimately poorly received religious film from the Mel Gibson canon She had visions, was psychic, and spent most of her adult life traveling across Europe and the Middle East while refusing to have sex with her husband At the same time, she traveled with a colorful variety of men, and if she slept with any of them she s certainly not going to tell us God punished her for twelve days by making her see visions of naked men prancing back and forth in front of her with the devil telling her she had to fuck all of them, and all she had to do was pick who would be first I make it sound kind of interesting, or at least readable It is not Here s my summary of Margery s book blah blah blah blah blah blah i m not worthy blah blah jesus blah blah blah god is awesome blah blah blah blah self righteous blah blah blah blah jesus blah blah blaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhh jesus blah Amen.Read for Women in Early British Literature

  7. Elisabeth says:

    Review will follow I just need to write my essay first.

  8. Lynden Rodriguez says:

    This book is notable as being the first autobiography in the English Language But that s where the debate begins Margery Kempe was a remarkable woman who would have stood out in any age As a Carmelite familiar with the mystical life, I find that Margery Kempe is authentic Although there are many who would argue that That is because they are unfamiliar with the contemplative and meditative life And I must admit that Margery had her share of gifts She had an extraordinary sense of prayer an This book is notable as being the first autobiography in the English Language But that s where the debate begins Margery Kempe was a remarkable woman who would have stood out in any age As a Carmelite familiar with the mystical life, I find that Margery Kempe is authentic Although there are many who would argue that That is because they are unfamiliar with the contemplative and meditative life And I must admit that Margery had her share of gifts She had an extraordinary sense of prayer and dedication to God and Christ And although she excelled in these and many other gifts, there was one gift that many could not accept Her gift of tears I have heard of this gift but Margery annoyed everyone with her gift even with those who were her friends Margery s story is remarkable, because she traveled extensively and knew many of the key players in her age She even spent some time in her travels with Dame Julian of Norwich, who authored Revelations of Divine Love But even if you do not agree with Margery s authentic religious life, her book is recommended as an inside look at the Middle Ages and an introduction to the famous people in her world

  9. Ygraine says:

    margery kempe is an unmistakably physical presence, a voice that rings clear over the centuries, a body that she reinstates ownership over again and again, a soul that she lays bare to the world there is something very lonely in the story of a woman who must exist in the liminal space between layperson and saint, aspiring to one and shunning the other but never quite belonging to either despite her own surety that earthly scorn will be heavenly joy, that her distance from the people around her margery kempe is an unmistakably physical presence, a voice that rings clear over the centuries, a body that she reinstates ownership over again and again, a soul that she lays bare to the world there is something very lonely in the story of a woman who must exist in the liminal space between layperson and saint, aspiring to one and shunning the other but never quite belonging to either despite her own surety that earthly scorn will be heavenly joy, that her distance from the people around her will bring her closer to christ, that her current pain is as deserved as her future release, i m left with a kind of sadness that i can t quite shake

  10. Melanie Spiller says:

    What a hoot this book is Margery Kempe was a real person, someone who, after having a bunch of children and many years of marriage, decided that she wanted to be a nun So she traveled to Rome from England to get a papal annulment, and discovered that she enjoyed traveling so much that she went on Jerusalem Her adventures are told with a certain tongue in cheek and also some self righteous indignation that are both edifying and hilarious Even hearing only her side of things, the reader is g What a hoot this book is Margery Kempe was a real person, someone who, after having a bunch of children and many years of marriage, decided that she wanted to be a nun So she traveled to Rome from England to get a papal annulment, and discovered that she enjoyed traveling so much that she went on Jerusalem Her adventures are told with a certain tongue in cheek and also some self righteous indignation that are both edifying and hilarious Even hearing only her side of things, the reader is glad not to have known her I ve recently bought a companion book to this because I m eager to read it again, only with all the references to what else was going on at the time and what certain catholic isms mean