Darkest England

Read Darkest England  By Christopher Hope – johndore.co.uk
  • Hardcover
  • 283 pages
  • Darkest England
  • Christopher Hope
  • English
  • 02 December 2017
  • 0393040402

About the Author: Christopher Hope

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Darkest England book, this is one of the most wanted Christopher Hope author readers around the world.


Darkest England Nineteenth century British explorers are lampooned in this reverse travelogue by South African novelist Christopher Hope A contemporary South African Bushman, David Mungo Booi, chronicles his exploration of the wilds of England en route to meet the queen Wanting to collect on a promise made by the queen s great great grandmother to protect his people, David encounters the worst of British society upon entering the pastoral country racist customs officials who imprison him, a picturesque town whose residents are bent on lynching him, and a big game hunter who wants to add him to his private reserve of African endangered specimens Only in the end does he find compassion, and in the strangest of places. Download Darkest England – johndore.co.uk

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10 thoughts on “Darkest England

  1. Kristin says:

    This was a very strange book It was brilliant in places with such sharp satire, very much a flip side to the anodyne English character as Kate Fox describes it in Watching the English You see the cruelty and greed and harshness of not just the English, though specifically oriented to aspects of their national character, but the peoples of all wealthy western nations You can t help but laugh as you groan at the way in which it is described through the ideas of a very naive aboriginal from the This was a very strange book It was brilliant in places with such sharp satire, very much a flip side to the anodyne English character as Kate Fox describes it in Watching the English You see the cruelty and greed and harshness of not just the English, though specifically oriented to aspects of their national character, but the peoples of all wealthy western nations You can t help but laugh as you groan at the way in which it is described through the ideas of a very naive aboriginal from the Cape Even from the beginning the novel was patchy, with areas that just didn t seem to come off the way the author had intended, but these spots grew larger and larger until they took over the novel from about halfway through It then became so absurd with events beingandoutside of any sense of reality and the same stereotypes being explored ad nauseum One began to find the portrayal of the naive Red Bushman to be offensive and evenstereotypical than that of the English characters and one read hoping ...