Cold Warriors: Writers Who Waged the Literary Cold War

Cold Warriors: Writers Who Waged the Literary Cold War PDF
    download books from your favorite authors on Apple books authors if they offended Warriors: Writers Who PDF ´ those in power The clandestine intelligence services of the United States, Britain, and the Soviet Union recruited secret agents and established vast propaganda networks devoted to literary warfare But the battles were personal, too friends turned on one another, lovers were split by political fissures, artists were undermined by inadvertent complicities And while literary battles were fought in print, sometimes the pen was exchanged for a gun, the bookstore for the battlefieldIn Cold Warriors, Duncan White vividly chronicles how this ferocious intellectual struggle was waged on both sides of the Iron Curtain Among those involved were George Orwell, Stephen Spender, Mary McCarthy, Graham Greene, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, John le Carr , Anna Akhmatova, Richard Wright, Ernest Hemingway, Boris Pasternak, Gioconda Belli, and V clav Havel Here, too, are the spies, government officials, military officers, publishers, politicians, and critics who helped turn words into weapons at a time when the stakes could not have been higherDrawing upon years of archival research and the latest declassified intelligence, Cold Warriors is both a gripping saga of prose and politics, and a welcome reminder that at a moment when ignorance is all too frequently celebrated and reading is seen as increasingly irrelevant writers and books can change the world."/>
  • ebook
  • 800 pages
  • Cold Warriors: Writers Who Waged the Literary Cold War
  • Duncan White
  • 10 January 2018
  • 0062449826

About the Author: Duncan White

Is Writers Who Waged the PDF/EPUB or a well known author, some of Writers Who PDF ✓ his books are a fascination for readers like in the Cold Warriors: Writers Who Waged the Literary Cold War book, this is one of the most wanted Duncan White author readers around the world.


Cold Warriors: Writers Who Waged the Literary Cold War[PDF / Epub] ☉ Cold Warriors: Writers Who Waged the Literary Cold War By Duncan White – Johndore.co.uk In this brilliant account of the literary war within the Cold War, novelists and poets become embroiled in a dangerous game of betrayal, espionage, and conspiracy at the heart of the vicious conflict In Writers Who Waged the PDF/EPUB or this brilliant account of the literary Writers Who PDF ✓ war within the Cold War, novelists and poets become embroiled in a dangerous game of betrayal, espionage, and conspiracy at the heart of the vicious conflict fought between the Soviet Union and the WestDuring the Cold Cold Warriors: eBook ✓ War, literature was both sword and noose Novels, essays, and poems could win the hearts and minds of those caught between the competing creeds of capitalism and communism They could also lead to blacklisting, exile, imprisonment, or execution for their authors if they offended Warriors: Writers Who PDF ´ those in power The clandestine intelligence services of the United States, Britain, and the Soviet Union recruited secret agents and established vast propaganda networks devoted to literary warfare But the battles were personal, too friends turned on one another, lovers were split by political fissures, artists were undermined by inadvertent complicities And while literary battles were fought in print, sometimes the pen was exchanged for a gun, the bookstore for the battlefieldIn Cold Warriors, Duncan White vividly chronicles how this ferocious intellectual struggle was waged on both sides of the Iron Curtain Among those involved were George Orwell, Stephen Spender, Mary McCarthy, Graham Greene, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, John le Carr , Anna Akhmatova, Richard Wright, Ernest Hemingway, Boris Pasternak, Gioconda Belli, and V clav Havel Here, too, are the spies, government officials, military officers, publishers, politicians, and critics who helped turn words into weapons at a time when the stakes could not have been higherDrawing upon years of archival research and the latest declassified intelligence, Cold Warriors is both a gripping saga of prose and politics, and a welcome reminder that at a moment when ignorance is all too frequently celebrated and reading is seen as increasingly irrelevant writers and books can change the world.

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10 thoughts on “Cold Warriors: Writers Who Waged the Literary Cold War

  1. Bert Hirsch says:

    Cold Warriors by Duncan WhiteDuncan White is a lecturer in both history and literature at Harvard University and his new book, Cold Warriors Writers Who Waged the Literary Cold War, is a worthwhile read for anyone with these dual interests It roughly covers the span from the Spanish Civil war to the fall of the Berlin War and the Soviet Union It depicts the unique role writers played in the ongoing struggle for dominance between the Western capitalist societies and the Socialist sphere domina Cold Warriors by Duncan WhiteDuncan White is a lecturer in both history and literature at Harvard University and his new book, Cold Warriors Writers Who Waged the Literary Cold War, is a worthwhile read for anyone with these dual interests It roughly covers the span from the Spanish Civil war to the fall of the Berlin War and the Soviet Union It depicts the unique role writers played in the ongoing struggle for dominance between the Western capitalist societies and the Socialist sphere dominated by Russia George Orwell, Arthur Koestler, Ernest Hemingway, Mary McCarthy, Kim Philby, John Le Carre, Graham Greene, Howard Fast, Richard Wright, Boris Pasternak, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and Vaclav Havel become major characters in this wide ranging tale White does an excellent job of providing back stories with little gems and gossip to enhance this tale of intrigue and courage On the political side he makes it clear that the Soviet, American and British Secret Services attempted to both promote, suppress and manipulate these writers to their own pollical gains Both Le Carre and Graham were themselves of both spheres, starting off as government agents before they became masters of fiction and suspense Hemingway led a small regiment of partisan fighters to aid the liberation of Paris at the end of WW II Vaclav Havel ended up as President of Czechoslovakia becoming a major player in the fall of the Soviet Empire while partying with Lou Reed, the Rolling Stones and designating Frank Zappa as a roving cultural envoy for this newly independent country Due to Duncan White s deep understanding of both history and literature, his fine writing, fun tidbits and grasp of the larger picture this 700 odd page book is a quick and entertaining read that I recommend to those interested in the history of writers as political persons

  2. Nancy says:

    Duncan White s Cold Warriors is an engrossing history of the writers who wielded their pen for political ends and how their governments promoted or silenced them during the Cold War The war was a conflict of ideas and books were used as weapons to attack political ideologies by writers on both sides of the Iron Curtain Some authors were spies while others unknowingly worked for CIA funded publications Writers resistant to government policy and programs were silenced, punished, imprisoned or k Duncan White s Cold Warriors is an engrossing history of the writers who wielded their pen for political ends and how their governments promoted or silenced them during the Cold War The war was a conflict of ideas and books were used as weapons to attack political ideologies by writers on both sides of the Iron Curtain Some authors were spies while others unknowingly worked for CIA funded publications Writers resistant to government policy and programs were silenced, punished, imprisoned or killed Dense with information, the book has the impetus of a thriller filled with shocking twists and multilayered characters The story begins with the Spanish Civil War and the disenchantment of George Orwell, spurring him to write his greatest novels White follows the Cold Was to the end of the Berlin Wall, Glasnost, and the Prague Spring with stories like that of the Czech playwright Vaclav Havel who was found guilty of subversion and imprisoned yet became president.I grew up seeing these writer s names on the bookshelves at the stores where I spent my allowance on paperbacks I had no idea of their political stance or that some were spies George Orwell, whose Animal Farm I bought and read as a teen Arthur Koestler, whose Darkness at Noon I had erringly thought was a science fiction book Boris Pasternak, whose Dr Zhivago I read after seeing the movie Alexander Solzhenitsyn s books were published when I was a young adult and at one time I owned all his books in hardcover Graham Greene I thought was a Catholic Writer.Mary McCarthy s The Group was a best seller Stephen Spender, who signed my copy of his book of selected poems at a poetry readingJohn le Carre, pen name of David Cornwall, an M16 spy whose fictionalized spy talk became adopted in real lifePlusAndrei SinyavskyRichard WrightErnest Hemingway Gioconda BelliVaclav Havel,Joan DidionIsaac BabelHoward FastLillian Hellman Mikhail SholokhovDuncan concludes that the battle between Communism and Capitalism has morphed into a war between forms of democracy and authoritarianism and populist nationalism Today s writers still resist and condemn and create bring visions of the kind of country and world we must become to flourish and, very possibly, to survive One lesson I learned from this book is that regardless of how I personally feel about a writer s ideas, the rights of freedom of speech and a free press is precious and integral to the preservation of a free society.I was given access to a free egalley by the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for a fair and unbiased review

  3. Dustin says:

    The Guardian recently published a phenomenal review of Duncan White s Cold Warriors. Here is the link Duncan White The Guardian recently published a phenomenal review of Duncan White s Cold Warriors. Here is the link Duncan White

  4. Jim Razinha says:

    So last year an uncorrected proof of this book arrived from the publisher and I had no idea why I didn t request it and when I called the number on the return label to find out which source had it sent I request books from different sites so I could post the review the guy I got said he was a warehouse and just shipped whatever book to whatever address he s told to The book I had requested took a couplemonths, which worked out in my favor because I got a full printed copy of that one So last year an uncorrected proof of this book arrived from the publisher and I had no idea why I didn t request it and when I called the number on the return label to find out which source had it sent I request books from different sites so I could post the review the guy I got said he was a warehouse and just shipped whatever book to whatever address he s told to The book I had requested took a couplemonths, which worked out in my favor because I got a full printed copy of that one Anyway, none of my resources listed this up for offer so I shelved it to eventually get to, as the subject did look interesting Then, back in August, I picked it up Yes, August It s a dense text and I kept setting it aside for other books.White has put together a sweeping case for the pen being mightier than the sword though we all know that the mutually assured destruction hadthan a bit to do with the end of the so called Cold War He admits that there is no real way to measure how effective literature was in affecting the readers of both sides, but as he lays out over his 700 pages the US and Soviet Union both took it seriously.I was fascinated at all of the various spying some prominent and less prominent but no less influential novelists did The NKVD really got it claws into quite a few And the incredible resources applied to combating the two political paradigms is boggling Long before Putin set his sights on using social media to bring about his desired outcome for an election, the Soviet Union was backing peace conferences in the West lion and lamb metaphors are implied And the US intelligence agencies funded their own anti Soviet conferences and publications The Soviets were quicker out of the box, though and the West had some catching up to do, slow to realize that they were already infiltrated.McCarthy s rabid zeal for trapping communist sympathies was at least mostly public The Soviet writers, and composers Shostakovitch really comes to mind and other artists, had it worse than a blacklist When Isaac Babel was arrested by the NKVD in 1939, they sealed his study after removing everything written from it and then began pulling his books from libraries The man had been arrested the writer was being erased Nikolai Yezhov, perpetrator of so many horrors before becoming a victim of his own machine said, We are launching an attack on the Enemy let there be no resentment if we bump someone with an elbow Better that ten innocent people should suffer than one spy get away When you cop wood, chips fly The number of flying chips is to this day numbing.Some writers profiled here that s rather an understatement chronicled, illuminated, revealed unveiled, isaccurate are widely known of by the masses example Orwell Some less so, and some quite a bit less so as they ve fallen into the great melting pot of history And White has captured a lot of history A lot This was a dismal time for many, and for the Soviets, tragic, caught up in Purges andThe text reads well, and at times like a thriller As with most histories, an author can only know so much if really at all and must necessarily fill in Skilled historians do so with insight, non historian hacks like Martin Dugard and his co writer make up stuff White is skilled One small note I flagged I ll shared here White quoted FDR Books cannot be killed by fire People die, but books never die No man and no force can put thought in a concentration camp forever No man and no force can take from the world the books that embody man s eternal fight against tyranny In this war, we know books are weapons.So inspiration for Bradbury

  5. Jason Wilson says:

    This excellent book starts with copies of Animal Farm being dropped into Russia by the US as propaganda and ends with the free availability of this and other books following Glasnost Along the way , in the study of the literature of the Cold War, there are familiar and unfamiliar characters also some great backstory I loved the account of the genesis of Smiley There is an even handed ness too we get the horror of the Stalinist purges but also of the McCarthyist persecution of the America This excellent book starts with copies of Animal Farm being dropped into Russia by the US as propaganda and ends with the free availability of this and other books following Glasnost Along the way , in the study of the literature of the Cold War, there are familiar and unfamiliar characters also some great backstory I loved the account of the genesis of Smiley There is an even handed ness too we get the horror of the Stalinist purges but also of the McCarthyist persecution of the American left There s also good stuff on periodicals on both sides and also a nod to popular culture via the Czech rock band Plastic People Shame there wasn ton film and music in this context The end of the Cold War is an exhilarating whirl though still with its terrors In the midst are writers like Graham Greene whose loyalties were always ambiguous, and John Le Carre But there are many other literary riches here too Sometimes the pen is mightier than the sword

  6. Matthew Trevithick says:

    4 stars,.5 for novelty and scope of the book huge fan of this book, which firmly establishes the importance of the written word in the Cold War competition before walking us through the absolutely fascinating lives of the writers whose works defined the times Right from the start, we get the details of a CIA operation to drop books behind the Iron Curtain through the use of hot air balloons, as well as the Soviet response using their Air Force to shoot them down It s a throwback to a time 4 stars,.5 for novelty and scope of the book huge fan of this book, which firmly establishes the importance of the written word in the Cold War competition before walking us through the absolutely fascinating lives of the writers whose works defined the times Right from the start, we get the details of a CIA operation to drop books behind the Iron Curtain through the use of hot air balloons, as well as the Soviet response using their Air Force to shoot them down It s a throwback to a time when books were considered extremely powerful as well as extremely dangerous, and a great way to frame this epic story As the author notes, with the presence of nuclear weapons on both sides, never had a struggle between two countries contained such an intellectual dimension the war was often quite literally a war of ideas 1984 and Animal Farm of course come to mind, but this 700 page read documents hundreds of additional books from all the major players on both the Western and Soviet side, as well as their absolutely riveting personal lives Authors who were drawn to romantic revolution, become disillusioned, apologize for Stalin, and so muchOn the Soviet side, so many were sent to the gulags The common thread to all stories is that intelligence services played such a consistent, if largely hidden, role in all this Folks are perhaps most familiar with the Soviet side, with the KGB tracking down every manuscript and shred of paper written by intellectuals and clearing it digging up backyards, sifting through fires, pulping hundreds of thousands of books, and so muchIn the West, EU and US agencies were very active in trying to nudge events in certain directions, realizing the potential for certain literature that could be weaponized against the USSR and dramatically boosting production, establishing conferences to get certain writers to cross paths, or quietly funding certain magazines, some of which at times confused intellectuals who prized their intellectual independence Fascinating as well were the stories in the older tradition of former spies becoming journalists and writers, as well as the defections back and forth Kim Philby, etc The book wraps up with John Le Carre and the collapse of the Soviet Union.My favorite parts of the book revolved around 1930s Spain, where this kaleidoscopic array of writers, journalists, spies, and military officers mingled and either fought with or against each other It is simply incredible to read about this time where authors and intellectuals, far removed from their Ivory Towers, went off to shoot at German fascists in the morning, discuss existentialism and huge ideas over lunch with coffee, dodge Italian artillery shells in the afternoon, and hide cyanide pills in false teeth before going to bed in case the fascists took their position while they were sleeping, always of course being mindful of snipers who picked off people as ran through contested parts of cities to get to cafes Wow Also, Russians know how to write, that is for sure I deeply appreciate how well researched this book is my notes contain the names of dozens and dozens of authors on both sides, as well asthan 100 books that defined this struggle, can t wait to dig into all of that I would have enjoyedclosure at the end of the book it wraps up in a hurry, almost aware that it s hard to stop a book full of the biggest ideas in the 20th century as lived and told by the most famous authors in the world in any manner other than to just finally hit the brakes Still, a few big thoughts by the author at the end about the state of intellectual warfare for lack of a better term today would have been interesting, as well as discussing how, if at all, this applies to the 21st century It did make a passing reference about the death of ideology idea being that the US, Russia and China are all just variants on capitalism , but I m not so sure.I have a hunch the war for ideas is about to heat up again, and there may be some lessons here The age of warfare through books might be over, but the war of ideas never ends

  7. Peter Goodman says:

    Cold Warriors writers who waged the literary Cold War, by Duncan White Custom House, 2019 The Cold War and before that, even before the Bolshevik Revolution was a war of ideas, and for much of it the Communists seemed to have the better ideas About how to organize society, provide for the people, how to govern, etc Because it was about ideas, the people who trafficked in thought and imagination had strategic and tactically important roles Literature, to use a modern term, was weapon Cold Warriors writers who waged the literary Cold War, by Duncan White Custom House, 2019 The Cold War and before that, even before the Bolshevik Revolution was a war of ideas, and for much of it the Communists seemed to have the better ideas About how to organize society, provide for the people, how to govern, etc Because it was about ideas, the people who trafficked in thought and imagination had strategic and tactically important roles Literature, to use a modern term, was weaponized Journalists, novelists, poets, playwrights providedthan propaganda they created characters, described situations, analyzed the results I just realized a resemblance to science fiction, which also posits situations and tries to see what would happen So Orwell, Koestler, Greene, Solzhenitzyn, Pasternak, Pavel wrote about what happened Orwell in Catalonia, for a perfect example, saw how Soviet Communists destroyed their leftist allies as eagerly as they fought fascists And that was before he got to Animal Farm and 1984 Animal Farm and even , 1984, probably had real effects on the defeat of Communism in western Europe Koestler described how the Communist ideologues could turn a person s mind against itself Solzhenitsyn provided portraits of life in the Soviet gulags etc But there wasto it than literary portrayals Both sides spent money and effort in covert campaigns The Soviets had their very extensive, internationally organized front groups, but the CIA funded magazines, publishing houses, tours, authors often without their knowledge, but often with their knowledge And then there were the actual spies here the Soviets clearly beat the West , such men as Kim Philby, who actually became a high level counterespionage official for the British while being a spy for the other side Stephen Spender WH Auden they too were deeply involved in writing for the other side John Le Carr David Cornwell was in fact a British operative who saw some of the things he wrote about, although he made up the organizational elements White spends a bittime than necessary on some of the espionage details and perhaps on events surrounding the writers activities the history of the Spanish Civil War, though he explains it very clearly But his description of what led up to the end of the USSR, with Gorbachev, Yeltsin, and finally back to Putin, is lucid and helpful The Reds were so much better organized than the West, which makes sense because they had actual plans and centralized planning, of course One interesting element, for me, is the major writers who aren t there Wolfe, Fitzgerald, Bellow, Updike, Faulkner, Roth But there are Hemingway, Nabokov a bit , a touch of Mailer Finally, in conclusion, White says this is not likely to happen again because we no longer are in a conflict of ideas but materials and systems within an essentially capitalist structure Even the Chinese are materialists within their totalitarian world Fascinating book

  8. JQAdams says:

    This book picks out a few important authors from around the world and Kim Philby, who the book itself concedes was only marginally a literary figure , then explores their engagement with communism s battle with the rest of the world For White s purposes, the literary Cold War evidently lasted longer than the conventional one, or at least the first 200 odd pages of this book cover events from the Spanish Civil War through 1945 Indeed, the subtitle s waged the war is also somewhat misleading, This book picks out a few important authors from around the world and Kim Philby, who the book itself concedes was only marginally a literary figure , then explores their engagement with communism s battle with the rest of the world For White s purposes, the literary Cold War evidently lasted longer than the conventional one, or at least the first 200 odd pages of this book cover events from the Spanish Civil War through 1945 Indeed, the subtitle s waged the war is also somewhat misleading, in that the collected authors include not just writers like George Orwell, Arthur Koestler, and Alexander Solzhenitsyn, who actively wrote to try to support the anti communist position notably, White doesn t dig up any protagonists who were active pro Stalinist cold warriors , but also people like Anna Akhmatova who was persecuted for having an outlook antithetical to the Communist system even if she didn t do much that was on its face part of the Cold War or Richard Wright whose engagement with the Non Aligned Movement and the Bandung Conference was pretty explicitly designed to move past sterile US vs USSR conflict , or those whose funding derived wittingly or otherwise from the CIA, or those like Graham Greene and John le Carr who wrote about Cold War shenanigans.As that suggests, it s kind of a jumble, seemingly mostly defined by here s who the author felt like writing about That is okay, but as you might expect the sprawl means that sometimes the author is outside his wheelhouse Not only does that mean that you get some questionable fact checking you d think a Harvard lecturer would not goof the name of a British Prime Minister in both text and footnotes, but Howard Wilson it is , it also means White tends to focus on the best known cases rather than the most telling or unfamiliar The most obscure of the featured authors here are on the order of Andrei Sinyavsky, Gioconda Belli, and V clav Havel, and they each only get one chapter whilefamous folks often get several I might have been particularly disappointed in this because several of the chapters are essentially summaries of other accounts that I d already read for instance, the Pasternak chapter draws heavily from The Zhivago Affair, as the notes indicate, and a lot of the espionage antics come from Ben Macintyre s stuff There s room for that sort of breadth not depth approach, but when you ve already seen the depth of the particular cases the accounts tend to feel pedestrian

  9. Peter Wise says:

    This is an extensive history of how the West and the Soviet Union influenced, directed and duped writers of either side of the ideological divide, beginning with the Spanish Civil War and ending with the dissolution of the USSR in the 1990s There are really no surprises chronicled here, no spectacular revelations about how governments seek to implement policy through culture but it s a really good read despite the length While I also sensed in advance, it would be favorable to the West this is This is an extensive history of how the West and the Soviet Union influenced, directed and duped writers of either side of the ideological divide, beginning with the Spanish Civil War and ending with the dissolution of the USSR in the 1990s There are really no surprises chronicled here, no spectacular revelations about how governments seek to implement policy through culture but it s a really good read despite the length While I also sensed in advance, it would be favorable to the West this is as much because the author IS from the West and a cultural bias is to be expected He gets the facts straight and that s really all that matters What I do find weak about the narrative is White doesn t seem to grasp the roots of the rise of Bolshevism and the ensuing victories, defeats and corruption of the Revolution s principles along the lines of the second law of thermodynamics but perhaps that s not within the scope of an already large book Somewhat amusing is how writers, especially on the side of the capitalist west could easily be duped by the CIA and MI5 especially anti communist leftists who were the toast of the academic world Writers in Soviet bloc nations and the USSR itself were not as naive and in many ways this dichotomy seemslike a division between ghetto kids and Birkenstock bourgeoisie Nevertheless, some writers shine My favorite is Graham Greene and his relatively incorruptible course through the Cold War as a writer who could see through governmental and political machinations as well or better than George Orwell The style and execution of this book are both excellent how it s organized is quite comprehensible and it allows for an enjoyable read unhindered by complicated prose It s almost journalistic and I look at that as a positive Finally, the author s conclusions are forthright and to my mind, exactly correct the Cold War was won for the wrong reasons in retrospect, not just because the victors write the history they always do but because the ramifications of the fall of the USSR are certainly as dark as any nuclear war scenario people of my generation were taught to fear These are my words, not the author s implicitly, but I think the inference is that capitalism triumphant will doom this planet as surely as the H bomb now that the ideological wars have ceased

  10. Terry Tucker says:

    AMAZING Story I highly recommend this book.The writers of the time are easily cast into generalizations but that is too easy The author s decision to tell the literary history of the Cold war through the writers and the books they wrote is both statement and argument, The work is based on declassified documents, archival work and in the words of the authors themselves This book fills an critically important history in an overlooked aspect of the Cold War Everyone is familiar with propaganda, AMAZING Story I highly recommend this book.The writers of the time are easily cast into generalizations but that is too easy The author s decision to tell the literary history of the Cold war through the writers and the books they wrote is both statement and argument, The work is based on declassified documents, archival work and in the words of the authors themselves This book fills an critically important history in an overlooked aspect of the Cold War Everyone is familiar with propaganda, however this book is different This book is about the authors and the transformation some of them made from socialism, to communism, to outright hate of Stalinism or on the other hand, stiffened resolve to remain loyal to communism This book looks at how literature on both sides of the iron curtain was the key to winning the hearts and minds it is also a story about how serious his was to the Superpowers By 1940, the Soviet Union was professional in its use of propaganda and disinformation Despite the fact that the Office of war Information was stood up in 1942, it would still take the US another 15 years to even catch up with the sophistication of the Soviets During this period, the suppression of literature and the consequences for deviation became muchserious The list of writers is a list of who s who F Scott Fitzgerald, Hemingway, T.S.Eliot, Steinbeck, Edmund Wilson, Mikhail Sholokhov, Vasily Grossman until he converted , George Orwell, Maxim Gorky, Boris Pasternak..et.al. The campaign to influence writers was overt and covert Some of these authors advertently or inadvertently were recruited Some found out afterwards they had been duped and others went in with eyes wide open The dynamics of all this also made the US Government a supporter of difficult elitist art of James Joyce and William Faulkner, simply because it was banned by Moscow The lines were blurred between official validation, collaboration, and sanction These artists and writers were on the frontline of how the Cold war was played out the led double lives, acted as spies, volunteered for foreign wars, engaged in insurgencies, churned out propaganda, and exposed hypocrisy Lastly, this book is about complicity and duplicity and how the writers grappled with it albeit sometimes this must be inferred by how they reacted and their actions