Jinnah, Pakistan and Islamic Identity: The Search for Saladin

Jinnah, Pakistan and Islamic Identity: The Search for
    download books from your favorite authors on Apple books We know a great deal about the first three, but Mohammed Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan, has mostly either been ignored or, in the case of Richard Attenborough's hugely Pakistan and Islamic PDF/EPUB ì successful film about Gandhi, portrayed as a cold megalomaniac, bent on the bloody partition of India Akbar Ahmed's major study redresses the balanceDrawing on history, semiotics and cultural anthropology as well as conventional biographical techniques, Akbar S Ahmad presents a rounded picture of the man and shows his relevance as contemporary Islam debates alternative forms of political leadership in a world dominated at least in the Western media by figures like Colonel Gadaffi and Saddam Hussein."/>
  • Paperback
  • 304 pages
  • Jinnah, Pakistan and Islamic Identity: The Search for Saladin
  • Akbar Ahmed
  • English
  • 12 July 2017
  • 9780415149662

About the Author: Akbar Ahmed

and Islamic ePUB ´ and Islamic ePUB Is a wellknown author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Jinnah, Pakistan and Islamic Identity: The Search for Saladin book, this is one of the most wanted Akbar Ahmed author readers around Jinnah, Pakistan eBook Ê the world.


Jinnah, Pakistan and Islamic Identity: The Search for Saladin❴Ebook❵ ➠ Jinnah, Pakistan and Islamic Identity: The Search for Saladin Author Akbar Ahmed – Johndore.co.uk Every generation needs to reinterpret its great men of the past Akbar Ahmed, by revealing Jinnah's human face alongside his heroic achievement, both makes this statesman accessible to the current age and Islamic ePUB ´ Every generation needs to reinterpret its great men of the past Akbar Ahmed, by revealing Jinnah's human face alongside his heroic achievement, both makes this statesman accessible to the current age and renders his greatness even clearer than beforeFour men shaped Jinnah, Pakistan eBook Ê the end of British rule in India: Nehru, Gandhi, Mountbatten and Jinnah We know a great deal about the first three, but Mohammed Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan, has mostly either been ignored or, in the case of Richard Attenborough's hugely Pakistan and Islamic PDF/EPUB ì successful film about Gandhi, portrayed as a cold megalomaniac, bent on the bloody partition of India Akbar Ahmed's major study redresses the balanceDrawing on history, semiotics and cultural anthropology as well as conventional biographical techniques, Akbar S Ahmad presents a rounded picture of the man and shows his relevance as contemporary Islam debates alternative forms of political leadership in a world dominated at least in the Western media by figures like Colonel Gadaffi and Saddam Hussein.

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10 thoughts on “Jinnah, Pakistan and Islamic Identity: The Search for Saladin

  1. Sairah says:

    This is definitely one of the best books on Pakistan history I have read. Akbar Ahmed really takes you inside Jinnah's life; it's trite but I felt as if I were there as he described everything. He goes into Jinnah's personal life and has very interesting anecdotes about Jinnah's relationship and interactions with his sister, his wife, and his daughter.

    It's hard to address the idea of Pakistan without talking about for what reasons it was created. Ahmed does this well in talking about Islamic identity specific to this context, and not lumping Muslims all over the world together.

    All together a really informative and very interesting book. Reads like a story. Also, the pictures are SWEET.

  2. Zeeshan Butt says:

    Well balanced opinion about India, Pakistan and most Ignored but Charismatic leader of South Asia, M. A Jinnah.
    Undoubtedly, Jinnah is among the Top Ten all time great leaders of the world.

  3. Kushal Srivastava says:

    The premise of this book promised good scholarship but the book is anything but. It’s just full of gossips and tabloid journalism. There are chapters devoted to what the people were gossiping about and anecdotal evidences and hearsay denoted as history.

    I don’t think that anybody can deny that Jinnah was the key figure of Sub-continent history maybe even misunderstood. But the author spends too much time finding proof that he was warm hearted (all of which fall a bit flat - for ex proofs like he was smiling in a photo) and then trying to demonize Nehru because it seems he was more charming than Jinnah (at least as per Mountbattens).

    Ahmed also calls people like Andrew Roberts for support who among other things has supported Iraq war, Margaret Thatcher, and has racist views of South Africa. Well, pretty much uncooked, this book.

  4. Dr.J.G. says:

    Perhaps this book might answer some questions and solve some of the puzzles, hence the worth reading - even a partial answer, part solution would take one further in this riddle.

    Jinnah was not religious, this much is indisputable - he despised orthodox fellow Muslims as much as he looked down on others not quite of his class, which in his days meant upper class in money as well as a western oriented education. He was urbane, sophisticated, lawyer living in Bombay who had married a Parsi woman.

    Parsi is the name the community goes by, of Persians that fled Islamic forces to escape the kill or convert horrors, to survive in India - and nowhere else until recent couple of centuries - and flourish. It is a small community, mostly existing only in India.

    The one time his personal life showed any sentiment of religious sort is when his daughter married another Parsi, Wadia, when Jinnah was seriously displeased and disowned her in most ways.

    How this man of urbane western non religious sort came to be not only a proponent of a division of an ancient land and coherent nation like India to cut out a part that was based on a religious identity, whence most followers of any other religions were persecuted, hounded, massacred and thrown out in any way at all possible, has been a curiosity for those not of his religion - there, he did only what was right, a beginning of a conversion of India by cutting it into pieces and wiping out any followers of any other faith by conversion or massacre or both, thus purifying it in the eyes of pure Muslims - hence the very name of the nation he carved out of a living land, Pakistan (which literally translates as land of the pure) by using every method possible.

    He remained Indian at heart nevertheless even after he had had his wish, of being the premier of the new nation, and sent a personal message to Nehru through a common acquaintance to forget about the separation and unite as a nation again, even as he was within less than a year of his death. (This message being personal, not official, had no status; moreover he had just orchestrated an attack on India taking half Kashmir and pretending it was only a tribals revolt, the pretense falling apart inadvertently when he spoke with Mountbatten in an official capacity; so the message was of no use to heal the nation divided, however heartfelt it may have been.)

    How did such a man come from his urbane sophisticated upper class westernised persona to be the one that called for an action day for the Muslim League who obeyed him and massacred thousands of Hindus in Calcutta in one day or two, breaking spirit of Mahatma Gandhi into accepting the partition of the beloved country into one secular and other with a separate religious identity, is the puzzle being explored recently by many.

    Was it only that he could not tolerate supremacy of any other person, neither in his personal life nor in his political party? When he came to Congress other great leaders were either far too great for him to compete, and already either past their primes or going another path of the quest for freedom of India. Nehru was still young, and age along with experience and wisdom commands respect in older cultures particularly of Asia. Jinnah's discomfort came from the new arrival on the scene of someone from fame in another land in the fight for freedom, someone with already an acknowledged stature - Gandhi himself.

    Gandhi turned the struggle into a direction totally unforeseen by the until then clique of Congress, which had been mostly educated and going the way of legal protests and demands of moderate sort, with few exceptions such as Tilak with his outspoken declaration of independence and right thereof. Gandhi brought several new factors, one being a connecting with ALL of people of India, not merely restricting the independence struggle to upper class educated people. Another one was use of fasting and prayers as a mode of protest across all faiths, and yet another being uniting of all people of India under one giant roof irrespective of faith or religion. Even his prayers were not restricted to his own religion, and he followed Christ in many ways.

    Jinnah was uncomfortable with all of this and distanced himself increasingly from the Congress which until then he was an integral part of - and one naturally questions if it was due to his no longer being the leader he thought he indisputably was, since his subsequent political actions had nothing to do with his until then persona and thinking as known - he became the leader of a very narrow vision political party with a single agenda, opposing Congress at all costs and carving out a nation with Muslim supremacy.

    At one time he was offered to name his terms for giving up this demand, and his option was to rule India with his choice of Muslim total rule, harking back to the era of Muslim invaders occupation of India before the British rule. This naturally was untenable. Action day finished any possibility of a dialogue further, and to his immense surprise and dismay he got his demand of a separate part carved out to rule for himself.

    Even then his vision was of a secular nation of Pakistan where people of all religions could live together in peace, and he said as much in his first public speech in his capacity of a premier of a new nation. That this was not to be was obvious to anyone with any logic - one does not carve out a secular nation with a religious identity, out of an ancient nation with a secular identity, to begin with; much less so by using riots and massacres as action for the purpose, calling for action day to make it happen. Was he attempting to fool everyone, or himself, is a good question.

    Was it all only so he could be a premier, which ironically he could very well have achieved and been president or even prime minister of India if he had not insisted on partition, is not only an obvious question but the most likely answer. Ambition is all very well when moderated by consideration for rights of others and especially their right to life, is the first lesson here - when unmindful of trampling over the whole world and one's own country as well, one may get what one demands, and lose everything one loves and wishes and lives for.

  5. Tariq Mahmood says:

    Extremely biased pro-Jinnah book but raises some important points about the whole way the Hindu majority perceived the Muslim minority as outsiders who were either rulers or rebels, but not as serious nation builders who could participate in the development of India. In this climate came in a born-again Muslim saviour who wanted to represent a modern Islam version which could compete with any other modern religion in the world. Akbar successfully presents how Jinnah was able to wrestle away Pakistan from the British Establishment and the Hindu Lobby but was unable to explain the second question he had raised in the preface of the book about why most Pakistanis feel safer in London rather than Karachi, especially now that the Muslims have had ample time to prove the Hindus wrong?

  6. Rabya says:

    my people!
    well, you're all my people;
    good book

  7. Ahmed Raja says:

    An honest, informed and personal account by Akbar Ahmed. A good read.