Elizabeth of Bohemia: A Novel about Elizabeth Stuart, the Winter Queen

Elizabeth of Bohemia: A Novel about Elizabeth Stuart, the
    Elizabeth of Bohemia: A Novel about Elizabeth Stuart, the back the Hapsburg throne Defeated at the Battle of White Mountain, Frederic, Elizabeth, and their children are forced into exile for a muchreduced life in The Hague Despite tumultuous seasons of separation and heartache, the Winter Queen makes every effort to keep her family intactWritten with cinematic flair, this historical novel brings in key figures such as Shakespeare and Descartes as it recreates the drama and intrigue of thcentury England and the Continent Elizabeth's children included Rupert of the Rhine and Sophia of Hanover, from whom the Hanoverian line descended to the present Queen Elizabeth II."/>
  • Paperback
  • 360 pages
  • Elizabeth of Bohemia: A Novel about Elizabeth Stuart, the Winter Queen
  • David Elias
  • 23 December 2019
  • 9781770414631

About the Author: David Elias

Is a well known author, some Bohemia: A PDF/EPUB Ã of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Elizabeth of Bohemia: A Novel about Elizabeth Stuart, the Winter Queen book, this is one of the most wanted David Elizabeth of Kindle - Elias author readers around the world.


Elizabeth of Bohemia: A Novel about Elizabeth Stuart, the Winter Queen❮Read❯ ➮ Elizabeth of Bohemia: A Novel about Elizabeth Stuart, the Winter Queen ➲ Author David Elias – Johndore.co.uk A sweeping, cinematic novel about the life of the Winter Queen, Elizabeth Stuart

October King James I is looking to expand England's influence in Europe, especially among the Protestants He A sweeping, cinematic novel about the Bohemia: A PDF/EPUB Ã life of the Winter Queen, Elizabeth StuartOctoberKing James I is looking to expand England's influence in Europe, especially among the Protestants He invites Prince Frederic of the Palatinate to London and Elizabeth of Kindle - offers him his yearold daughter Elizabeth's hand in marriage The fierce and intelligent Elizabeth moves to Heidelberg Castle, Frederic's ancestral home, where she is favored with whatever she desires, and the couple begins their family Amid much turmoil, of Bohemia: A Epub ß the Hapsburg emperor is weakened, and with help from Bohemian rebels, Frederic takes over royal duties in Prague Thus, Elizabeth becomes the Queen of Bohemia But their reign is brief Within the year, Catholic Europe unites to take back the Hapsburg throne Defeated at the Battle of White Mountain, Frederic, Elizabeth, and their children are forced into exile for a muchreduced life in The Hague Despite tumultuous seasons of separation and heartache, the Winter Queen makes every effort to keep her family intactWritten with cinematic flair, this historical novel brings in key figures such as Shakespeare and Descartes as it recreates the drama and intrigue of thcentury England and the Continent Elizabeth's children included Rupert of the Rhine and Sophia of Hanover, from whom the Hanoverian line descended to the present Queen Elizabeth II.

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10 thoughts on “Elizabeth of Bohemia: A Novel about Elizabeth Stuart, the Winter Queen

  1. Lois says:

    Boring, sexist and terrible narrator.

  2. Shannon says:

    A decent little book, very similar to every book about a royal woman. There was a bit too much complaining for my tastes. The narrator would spend page after page asking existential questions like what is it to be a woman and what is it to die, etc. It was very meta at times, but also very boring. I can ponder feminism in the seventeenth century on my own. I don't need to read someone else's musings, especially when they take up so much of the book. In my opinion, the strength of the book is the beginning, where we get to hang out with Shakespeare and see a few of his plays. I could have easily lived without the Rene Descartes sections, but that's really a matter of preference.

    I recommend for those interested in the Stuarts or interested in the start of the Hanoverians, as it's through this Elizabeth that they trace their link to James I. Interesting history, made somewhat boring because of its similarity to the tale of nearly every highborn woman between 1100 and 1800. I wish more time had been spent describing Heidelberg and Prague and less time on how annoying it was to have to give birth thirteen times, but honestly, who wouldn't complain about that?

  3. Laurie says:

    In 1596, Elizabeth Stuart was born to James IV of Scotland (soon to be James I of England when Queen Elizabeth I died) and Anne of Denmark. In 1616 she was married to Frederic V, the Elector Palatine of the Rhine (part of the Holy Roman Empire). On his part, it was a love marriage (and they married on Valentine’s Day); she was far less enthusiastic but found him tolerable. She is ambitious; he is not.

    They lived happily in Heidelberg for a while; Elizabeth had 13 children. When the Bohemians overthrew their king, Ferdinand, Frederic was elected to that post. But his rule only lasted a few months before Ferdinand regained his throne and Frederic and Elizabeth had to flee. The Princes of Orange at the Hague took them in and supported hem. But they were not supported in the style to which they were accustomed, and this grated Elizabeth to no end. She conducted an incessant letter writing campaign, seeking aid from Parliament, her brother Charles (who was now King of England), and the English ambassadors.

    It’s an interesting story, and we get to see it from the POV of a largely ignored character in history. But the story drags at times; there is just not enough of Elizabeth’s life that is interesting for a book of this size. I found myself really wishing at times that the author hadn’t made it so detailed, although I did enjoy the parts about Elizabeth and Walter Raleigh, and Descartes.

    Elias does a good job of recreating the language of the era. Elizabeth is an important figure in that her descendants went on to become kings and queens of England. Elizabeth just does not come off as a compelling character; her scheming and complaining get very tiring after a while. The death of her beloved brother Henry left her shattered, and perhaps unable to love again. It’s the only explanation for her disregard for her children and husband.

  4. Annette says:

    London 1612: Sixteen year old Elizabeth Stuart meets Frederick V as he was chosen to be her husband. The match seems to be pleasing to both of them. The following year, they get married. The story follows their move to Heidelberg Castle, further with help from Bohemian rebels, Frederic takes over royal duties in Prague. Thus, Elizabeth becomes the Queen of Bohemia during a brief reign.

    The story is intertwined with many letters including ones from her cousin Arabella Stuart, who is imprisoned at the Tower due to a fact that she married William Seymour, the man she loved, in a secret ceremony, instead of picking one of the suitors picked by King James, Elizabeth’s father. Elizabeth promised to persuade her father to be merciful.

    The story is tangled with such names as Alfonso Ferrabosco – Italian composer working in England and Ingo Jones – the most notable architect in England. It was interesting to come across such distinguished names.

    I was looking forward to reading about the Queen of Bohemia, so called Winter Queen as I’ve never read a book about her. But the issue is the progression of the story overwhelmed with dialogue and not well-developed characters. Probably most of the story is written through dialogue and I didn’t feel a connection with any of the characters. Also, the way the story is presented it’s more of explanatory execution instead of being presented in action.

    @FB/BestHistoricalFiction

  5. Katie Lewis says:

    It’s hard for me to say negative things about a book because I know that the author devoted so much of themselves to writing it. But this story really fell flat for me. It was obvious that it was not a woman writing the inner thoughts of this formidable queen. It was annoying to hear her narrated by a man. I don’t know any women who are that one dimensional. She seemed excessively negative and even whiny. It was really exhausting to read. My mother told me I should just stop and mark it DNF. I hate quitting so I finished it and was disappointed.

  6. Annie says:

    Elizabeth of Bohemia is the daughter of James I of England and the grand-daughter of Mary Queen of Scots. I had not heard of Elizabeth before and was excited to read this novel.

    It was interesting to read about the situation in England at the time and the how her parents treated her and her siblings. Elizabeth was very resilient and relied on herself more than anyone else. I found it hard to be sympathetic to Elizabeth and therefore did not connect to her very much but I enjoyed reading about her life and where her children ended up.

  7. Ginger Pollard says:

    I found this to be a highly enjoyable book based on little known Elizabeth of Bohemia. She was the daughter of King James I, sister to King Charles I. King James was the sucessor of Queen Elizabeth I. She lead a fascinating life and I was glad to read her story.
    Not to be missed by Historical Fiction Lovers!
    I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley. Thank you so much,Netgalley!
    All opinions are my own.

  8. Rebecca says:

    This book tells the story of the life of Elizabeth Stuart, a daughter of James I of England. It builds up to be marriage to Frederick of Bohemia and then tells us about her life from there. The beginning was engaging and excellent but then I felt the story began to flag. It felt like the author lost direction somewhat and characters became stilted in their words and their actions. I found the second half of this a a struggle which was a shame as it began to promisingly.

  9. Moniek Bloks says:

    In 1596, Elizabeth Stuart, the eldest daughter of King James VI Scotland and Anne of Denmark, was born. In 1603 the old Queen Elizabeth I of England passed away without leaving an heir. The throne passed to James who was crowned James I of England. As the daughter of the King of England, Elizabeth Stuart was in the public eye from a young age, and as a granddaughter of Mary Queen of Scots and god-daughter of Elizabeth I, she was well-loved in many circles. Despite Europe being forever at war, James I aimed to be a peaceful king and the self-styled Rex Pacificus planned to use dynastic marriages to keep peace with other nations, rather than waging war. From a string of suitors, in 1613 Elizabeth was married to Frederick V Elector Palatine.

    James had chosen an ideal match for his daughter, and it was love at first sight upon their meeting. The wedding of Elizabeth and Frederick took place on Valentine’s Day and was one of the biggest of the Seventeenth Century; the celebrations went on for months on end and carried on throughout the newlywed’s journey to Frederick’s ancestral lands. Elizabeth and Frederick lived in wedded bliss for many years in the beautiful Palatinate town of Heidelberg, in modern-day Germany. A number of children were born there in quick succession; Frederick Henry, Charles Louis and Elisabeth were all born within six years. Despite a revolt and three members of the reigning Emperor’s retinue being thrown from the window of Prague castle, in 1619 Ferdinand ascended the throne of Bohemia and also took the title of Holy Roman Emperor. Within a matter of months, the Bohemians had overthrown Ferdinand and elected Frederick V, Elizabeth’s husband, as their king.

    After just a few months of being Queen, Elizabeth’s happiness began to unravel, as Ferdinand aimed to regain his crown. He lost and Elizabeth's life as queen was now over. The saviour of the winter family was the United Provinces. Connected by blood to Frederick and enemies to the Habsburgs, the Princes of Orange provided a home at The Hague for the family as well as financial support. Elizabeth’s time as an exile was filled by her constant letter writing; to members of English Parliament, ambassadors, her brother Charles I and many others. (Read more here)

    Elizabeth of Bohemia: A Novel about Elizabeth Stuart, the Winter Queen by David Elias begins in Elizabeth's youth and takes us through the tragedies of her life, beginning with the death of Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales to whom she was especially close. We see her early married life and her and husband's short reign as King and Queen of Bohemia through her own eyes. Although it is an interesting perspective, the story felt very drawn out for me and I often found myself skipping ahead, hoping that it would become more lively. Overall, I am not sure this book was to my taste but to read from Elizabeth's perspective was certainly a nice change.

  10. Josee Sigouin says:

    In Elizabeth of Bohemia, author David Elias treats us to the life story of a seventeenth century woman, daughter to King James I in England, and destined to marry Frederick V, the Elector Palatine of the Rhine. It is as much a story of key moments in European history as it is one of life at court, intrigues, currying favours, miscalculations, and tempestuous family dynamics.

    Elias’s extensive research comes into sharp relief as we see through Elizabeth’s eyes such landmarks as The Tower and the palaces of Whitehall and Westminster in London, the castle at Heildelberg—and the spectacular gardens Frederick created for her there—and the imposing Prague Castle; as we meet such well-known figures as Sir Walter Raleigh and Monsieur René Descartes.

    Elizabeth lived through a prolonged period when she was out of favour with just about anyone who mattered in royal circles at the time. We are privy to how she managed to obtain for her many children the education they would need to survive through their adult lives. The means at her disposal, mostly a pen, ink and paper, are far from glamourous hence a sense of tedium descending on the narrative at that point. Kudos to author David Elias for not inventing intrigues to pad the novel but rather to letting us experience, in fiction, something that aligns with the realities of the age.

    I was given an advance reading copy of Elizabeth of Bohemia by publisher ECW Press in exchange for posting an honest review online. In summary: I recommend this novel to anyone who enjoys historical fiction and anyone who has visited, or plans to visit, the sites mentioned in this review. Having read Elizabeth of Bohemia will certainly enrich my next European vacation.