Second Lives, Second Chances

Second Lives, Second Chances  PDF ↠ Lives, Second
    download books from your favorite authors on Apple books areas in the surgical profession: pioneering and influencing international humanitarian medical missions in the developing world, being at the forefront of gender affirmation surgery for transgender people since , and the education and training of thanplastic and reconstructive surgeonsHis unstinting efforts to surgically correct cleft palates gave new lives to thousands Second Lives, ePUB è of children in developing countries As one of the original surgeons to perform gender affirmation surgery, Laub not only continually improved on his methods, but he also became a tireless advocate for the rights of transgender people His nonprofit foundation Interplast, now called ReSurge International has sent thousands of multidisciplinary teams to perform transformative and reconstructive surgery in the developing worldSecond Lives, Second Chances is than just a memoir; it's a testament to how the determination of one person can bring others together to make a lasting difference in the world."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 184 pages
  • Second Lives, Second Chances
  • Donald R. Laub
  • 09 February 2019
  • 9781770414679

About the Author: Donald R. Laub

Second Chances Epub Ý Is a well known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Second Lives, Second Chances book, this is one of the most wanted Donald R Laub author readers around the world.


Second Lives, Second Chances [PDF / Epub] ☉ Second Lives, Second Chances By Donald R. Laub – Johndore.co.uk The engrossing memoir of a plastic and reconstructive surgeon involved in groundbreaking and lifechanging procedures

Through his work in plastic and reconstructive surgery, Dr Donald Laub cha Second Chances Epub Ý The engrossing memoir of a plastic and reconstructive surgeon involved in groundbreaking and lifechanging proceduresThrough his work in plastic and reconstructive surgery, Dr Donald Laub changed the lives of thousands of people who had been shunned by society Dr Laub's influence fostered the development of three key areas in the surgical profession: pioneering and influencing international humanitarian medical missions in the developing world, being at the forefront of gender affirmation surgery for transgender people since , and the education and training of thanplastic and reconstructive surgeonsHis unstinting efforts to surgically correct cleft palates gave new lives to thousands Second Lives, ePUB è of children in developing countries As one of the original surgeons to perform gender affirmation surgery, Laub not only continually improved on his methods, but he also became a tireless advocate for the rights of transgender people His nonprofit foundation Interplast, now called ReSurge International has sent thousands of multidisciplinary teams to perform transformative and reconstructive surgery in the developing worldSecond Lives, Second Chances is than just a memoir; it's a testament to how the determination of one person can bring others together to make a lasting difference in the world.

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10 thoughts on “Second Lives, Second Chances

  1. Jeanette says:

    He writes just as you'd think a surgeon would. Succinct, exact, to the particular point- and with all kinds and levels of me, me, me in the middle. He's intrepid and he is also brave. One of those humans too that deserve superior accolade for the missions and interplay of outcomes that he has initiated and enabled within his life. I would hazard a guess few of us humans could have done the ultimate good for others that he has.

    And yet the book was dry and name call city for at least 1/3rd of its length. But the other 2/3rds was at least 4 star to the kudos, memories, and especially the unique individuals that he gives memory and history as his 4 or 5 biggest inspirational/ past human treasures. Treasures he found, operated upon, and who became icons and associates to his Interplast organization.

    I knew about all the plastic surgeries for cleft palates but not about the detailing for burn and scar or other conditions that are far more intricate and complicated. And where/how in the Western Hemisphere he has gone to make such a HUGE difference in those peoples' lives. They are NOT included, not even for schooling, when looking different. It's a stigma beyond what we in the more inclusive worlds can imagine.

    I found some of his reasoning and values rationalizations immensely fluid for what he wants, needs, aspires to do within surgeries. He's Catholic and I would love to ask him about Pope Francis and his latest wise dictate about transgenders. But Donald R. Laub has it right and he's intelligent. Why circle the rationalization wagons over such?

    Also, I get the feeling by who / what he mentions and who he doesn't include in memory- that he's no easy bedfellow to work with/for. And way too honest about employers too. I just loved how he described the people in the East Coast systems when he got the CA gig offer. And how he ended up on the Western coast. Yup, it's exactly like that. SO HONEST to the particulars!

    As I've read maybe 50 to 75 books by doctors and in this exact genre kind of manner- I have to say this one cuts to the quick, more and far faster than most. You are getting a lot of medical operation exact description here and not so much of Laub as many other books written on medical careers, fields that are memoir formatted.

    By the 3/4th point I have to tell the truth, I didn't want to read about ureters or scrotum sacs, or mucous from the bowels any longer.

  2. Jill Robbertze says:

    This very interesting memoir is written by a retired plastic surgeon who spent a lot of his time travelling to developing countries donating his services to do facial repairs to poor people with deformities such as cleft pallets, scarred burn victums etc He also pioneered some of the techniques used in sex-assignment surgeries. He sounds like such a lovely kind man who really has given back to society. If you are interesting in anything medical, as I am, you will find this a quick captivating read.

  3. Julie Haigh says:

    Engrossing, interesting and fascinating.

    Donald R Laub is now in his 80s and a retired plastic and reconstructive surgeon. His memoir contains key memorable cases and anecdotes and I found it absolutely fascinating.

    He's in his 60s at the start of his memoir, performing complex surgeries one minute, and then the next he was struggling with his words. It did seem he had suffered a stroke. No, it wasn't a stroke-at first he gets a devastating diagnosis-which later turns out to be wrong! But he wasn't out of the woods as he was presented with another fight for life with slim odds for success. On choosing this book to read, I thought this was just about his plastic surgery work-it grabs you straightaway as he starts his own journey to recovery too.

    Some of the events are short skips through parts of his life, brisk and to the point, and then we have more detailed descriptions, eg. accounts of operations-which was what I was expecting from this book and enjoyed reading these bits so much. As well as where he lives, he also worked on a staggering 159 volunteer trips to eg. Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, to help the disadvantaged, offering free cleft palate surgery, surgery for burns etc.

    I found this book really interesting. I love watching programmes on TV where they perform various plastic surgeries; particularly gender reassignment surgery. I didn't realise that it's not such a new thing-Donald Laub had been involved in this kind of surgery well before I had seen the first reports on TV. He would go on to perform 900 surgeries for transsexual patients.

    There were lots of Oh my goodness moments for me as I read. Quite a few unexpected happenings in here. There's some really good stuff in here, just my type of book. Some sections not as appealing to me-eg. quite a few names mentioned that were a bit lost on me-they are probably very eminent surgeons in the US, however, I hadn't heard of them as I'm in the UK, and I'm not in the medical field. A great medical memoir though and a fascinating read.


  4. Sue says:

    Book: Second Lives, Second Chances
    Author: Dr. Donald R. Laub

    What it's about: Through his work in plastic and reconstructive surgery, Dr. Donald Laub changed the lives of thousands of people who had been shunned by society. Dr. Laub's influence fostered the development of three key areas in the surgical profession: pioneering and influencing international humanitarian medical missions in the developing world, being at the forefront of gender affirmation surgery for transgender people since 1968, and the education and training of more than 50 plastic and reconstructive surgeons.

    Why I read it: The topic was of interest, and ECW offered an ARC.

    What I thought: So much stuff to carry along in the ol' brain in this book. I didn't mind his writing but at times I wished to hear more from others involved in the stories he told. I learned bits and pieces here and there. Worth a read. (It kept getting put aside for library books.)

  5. K. says:

    Spurred by surviving cancer that had a high mortality rate, Dr. Laub wrote this book to look back on his life and successes in medicine. We get treated to his full life, from birth to going into medical school to the career he built in surgery. His work on facial reconstruction has changed so many lives, as has his work in gender confirmation surgery. It was interesting to learn how he was introduced to both and why he was so dedicated to them and other worthy causes. And it was interesting to see his evolution and ways he let go of his biases as he learned more about his patients’ situation and the societal demands that needed to be changed. This was a fascinating journey through Dr. Laub’s life and the ways in which medicine has changed throughout the years within his two specialties. Wonderful book!

  6. Ivan Cortes says:

    Donald R. Laub is an example of a good human. Amazing book and inspirational life. The Universe is a better place for people like Donald R. Laub. Thanks

  7. Susan (aka Just My Op) says:

    I received a copy of this book through LibraryThing's Early Reviewer giveaway.
    The story this book tells, about a plastic surgeon who traveled the world to help reconstruct the poor who needed plastic surgery, is quite interesting. Later, the doctor became interested and then a pioneer in transgender surgery, matching the body to match the mind. This is a bit surprising, not only because he was early in the field but also because his is a religious background. I applaud the doctor's good works, although he did use the phrase “psychic income” a little too often.

    What I didn't like is that despite his generous and kind work for humans, he experimented on live dogs, pigs, cats, and chimps. And who knows what else? He shows no compassion or empathy for these animals. I cannot understand how one can have compassion, even hubris-led compassion, for humans and none for sentient animals. I know many will not agree with me on this.

    The writing is clear. It's not outstanding, but it does tell his story, and again, I applaud all his work with indigent and/or marginalized people, but I rather expect I would not enjoy his company.

  8. Brittany says:

    Dr. Laub is certainly unafraid to toot his own horn! And I think he'd tell you that himself. His strong personality, and the era he came of age in, definitely comes across in his writing. And I'm sure not everything discussed in the book was really as rosy as he made it seem. In the end, though, what he's managed to do and be a part of in terms of providing surgical care to underprivilaged and impoverished people and people who experience gender dysphoria outweighs anything personality-wise I might not appreciate. He is an excellent example of a global citizen, someone who became a doctor to make the world a better place and succeeded in doing so. It was important to me as well that he has such a strong faith and dedicated himself to working with transgender people, pioneering and providing gender affirmation surgery for much of his career. He sets a great example for others of faith who use their religion to stand against the medical care these people deserve. Overall, I didn't love the actual book, but the story is a good one.