Listen Up!: Recording Music with Bob Dylan, Neil Young, U2, the Tragically Hip, Rem, Iggy Pop, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Tom Waits

Listen Up!: Recording Music with Bob Dylan, Neil Young,
    download books from your favorite authors on Apple books inside stories, each chapter gives recording and producing information and tips with Listen Up!: PDF/EPUB ² expert understanding of the equipment used in making the world's most unforgettable records and explanations of the methods used to get the very best soundListen Up! is both production guide and exclusive backstage pass into the lives of some of the planet's most iconic musicians Writing with his brother Chris Howard, Mark Howard provides a rare glimpse into the normally invisible, almost secretive side of the music story: that of the producer and recording engineer."/>
  • Paperback
  • 232 pages
  • Listen Up!: Recording Music with Bob Dylan, Neil Young, U2, the Tragically Hip, Rem, Iggy Pop, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Tom Waits
  • Mark Howard
  • 04 February 2017
  • 9781770414822

About the Author: Mark Howard

Is Recording Music with Bob Epub / a well known Recording Music eBook ✓ author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Listen Up!: Recording Music with Bob Dylan, Neil Young, U, the Tragically Hip, Rem, Iggy Pop, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Tom Waits book, this is one of the most wanted Mark Howard author readers around the world.


Listen Up!: Recording Music with Bob Dylan, Neil Young, U2, the Tragically Hip, Rem, Iggy Pop, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Tom Waits❴Read❵ ➭ Listen Up!: Recording Music with Bob Dylan, Neil Young, U2, the Tragically Hip, Rem, Iggy Pop, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Tom Waits Author Mark Howard – Johndore.co.uk An albumbyalbum account of working with iconic artists such as Anthony Kiedis, Michael Stipe, Gord Downie, and Bono, from a leader in the field

Mark Howard, a record producerengineermixer and An Recording Music with Bob Epub / albumbyalbum account of Recording Music eBook ✓ working with iconic artists such as Anthony Kiedis, Michael Stipe, Gord Downie, and Bono, from a leader in the fieldMark Howard, a record producerengineermixer and a trailblazer in the industry, will take you through the starstudded world of recording and producing Grammy Awardwinning artists Listen Up! is an essential read for anyone interested in music and its making Along with the inside stories, each chapter gives recording and producing information and tips with Listen Up!: PDF/EPUB ² expert understanding of the equipment used in making the world's most unforgettable records and explanations of the methods used to get the very best soundListen Up! is both production guide and exclusive backstage pass into the lives of some of the planet's most iconic musicians Writing with his brother Chris Howard, Mark Howard provides a rare glimpse into the normally invisible, almost secretive side of the music story: that of the producer and recording engineer.

You may also like...

10 thoughts on “Listen Up!: Recording Music with Bob Dylan, Neil Young, U2, the Tragically Hip, Rem, Iggy Pop, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Tom Waits

  1. Barry Hammond says:

    Mark Howard has produced, recorded and/or mixed several classic records by some of the world's finest musicians. His memoir captures the stories of those discs and his part in them. Interesting as hell memoir by a guy who has seen and done amazing things. - BH.

  2. Ellen says:

    This is an honest review, in exchange for the copy of this book provided by ECW Press.

    Listen-up... was created with the support of the Canadian Council of Arts. It is a re-cap of many of the accomplishments of Mark Howard who is a Canadian record producer, engineer and mixer. The time frame of this book and his work is roughly from the mid 1980's, through the 90's and into the 2000's.

    This book may be of some interest to those interested in the music production of that time period. I feel it is primarily a music store book. Some knowledge of the equipment and the process is beneficial. While the back cover suggests it is a “production guide”, it is not instructional and not a reference guide.

    Mark takes you through the process of renting several buildings over the years to be used as recording studios. These are described in great detail and with some of the changes that they made to them. The recording equipment is listed in each case and it’s shipping and installation is sometimes discussed. How some unusual sounds were produced at the time (to please all involved) are in there as well. Part of his job also involved gathering the right studio musicians of the period for a particular job.

    There are some interesting anecdotes relating to the artists he recorded. Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell and Willie Nelson are just a few involved in this book. Most of these being in the later part of their career; still making great music.

    As with most artists at this level, we see many of their quirks and their eccentricities. Many are ego maniacs; some are pleasant some are not. Some have very bad and short fused tempers. To his credit, Mark was able to control these people enough to make some great recordings.

    In most forms of popular music being created today, there is a great reduction in the need for studio musicians. The methods are almost entirely digital. The vocals are often completely altered with voice processors. The instruments, the notes and chords needed are simply created on the computer screen. Music has become a line of code. So the relevance of this book might be compromised somewhat. But it is an interesting look at that time period and the accomplishments of Mark Howard.

  3. Jill says:

    Listen Up! gives readers an inside look at the incredible world of music engineering, producing and studio installations. Mark Howard has had the privilege of working through the decades with some talented musicians. This book provides Howard a great opportunity to share his stories and knowledge with a broader audience.

    Despite not knowing MANY of the artists (I know, I know how lame am I not to know the classics), or ANY of the equipment he mentions in detail throughout this book, I still found myself breezing through the oversized pages. I was intrigued and captivated by Mark’s lifestyle and frame of mind, from his “mobile studio” to being planted in new cities and expected to find the perfect recording location, his ability to adapt was commendable. Howard ensnares a world that many only dream of working in and invites readers in to view the hard work, flexibility and hours it took for him to be successful.

    Hats off to an extraordinary career full of talent and hard work. While we may be lucky to have artists such as Willie Nelson and Bob Dylan, we are equally (if not more) lucky to have talent like Mark Howard to capture their gift to share with the masses.

    *Disclaimer: A review copy of this book was provided by the publisher. All opinions are my own.

  4. Koozebane says:

    I received a digital ARC as part of the ECW Insiders program, formerly the Shelf Monkey program.

    As a fan of many of the artists involved, I enjoyed Howard's insider stories about them (well, the news of Daniel Lanois' terrible temper was startling to me). Some of the anecdotes segue in and out rather abruptly, though in the context of short-lived session work, that makes sense. The amount of nuts-and-bolts recording information seems just about right for a casual reader who isn't in the industry. (I admit I would have liked to know more about the continual high/in the red levels used for the Red Hot Chili Peppers' CALIFORNICATION. If I recall correctly, Greg Milner's PERFECTING SOUND FOREVER points to that record as the turning point for productions, causing an ill-advised trend of albums so maxed out that they are hard to listen to in one sitting, and sound wrong on the radio.) Howard keeps personal revelations to a minimum, which seems appropriate (though I am curious about certain developments).

  5. K. says:

    Admittedly, before reading this book, I didn’t know Mark Howard by name. However, I know and love each of the artists he has worked with over the years. This was a fascinating journey of a music producer who has helped shaped some of the most iconic albums of our era. I found myself drawn to the inside stories of not only the making of each album, but the artistic process behind them. And I was very happy to delve The Tragically Hip’s Day for Night, since I’m a forever fan. From Billy Ray’s unpaid position to Brad Pitt’s visit to recollection of the power of Gord Downie’s legacy, it was a very special glimpse into the making of the record. If you’re a music fan, especially if you’re a geek who loves the making-ofs, this is a great book for you! Learn how some of the music that shaped our generation got made.

  6. Roman Sokal says:

    A fascinating book about making records was just released by ECW press called Listen Up!. Its by recording engineer and producer Mark Howard with assistance by his brother Chris , and contains stories within stories about making records with Daniel Lanois, Neville brothers, tragically hip, red hot chili peppers, r.e.m. and iggy pop to name a few. The book is revelatory into the spirit of record making, (and the spirits that come and try to take part in a session?!) and has enough info about audio tecnology as well to satisfy the gear geek sort to speak. The book is in audiobook format as well at audible.ca . Way to go mark!

  7. Joe says:

    Howard is a semi-legendary engineer/producer/player who had a big hand in making some of the better records of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. While the technical jargon often went over my head, what did connect was his story of the personalities behind the music. The book would be a worthwhile read just for Howard's Bob Dylan stories, and his chapter on doing a record with Tom Waits was also fascinating. A fun read that shows the enthusiasm of Howard and many of the outstanding artists he's assisted.

  8. John says:

    “Listen up: when you sing, dance, or play music, your soul is at its best.”

    A good read, with some equipment minutia, but plenty of character sketches of many artists involved in these recordings. A fair number of them appear to be incredibly demanding, and if Howard’s accounts are any indication, a little entitled, but I guess the ends justify the means sometimes.

    Hats off to Mark Howard for weathering those storms, and helping birth some fantastic music.

  9. Richard Lehingrat says:

    Stories felt filtered and too clean.

  10. Bob says:

    Have you ever been around a musician or someone in the music biz that does nothing but tell you about all the quasi-famous people they’ve had encounters with (however brief) and you just feel like they’re sorta inflating the whole thing to sound cool? Then you realize that the people or situations they’re bragging about aren’t even very impressive in the grand scheme of things? Then your realize you’ve heard this crap from so many other needy people before that it’s all the same and the names and locations are just mixed around from the last person who told you these stories?

    Take that experience and make it into a book that’s a couple hundred pages long. Yup. That’s this book.

    Other than that....it was fine.