God's Big Plan

Hardcover  Ò God's Big Plan PDF µ God's Big  Epub /
    Hardcover Ò God's Big Plan PDF µ God's Big Epub / a new understanding of the story of Babel in Genesis, revealing God s plan for glorious diversity throughout the world God s Big Plan includes a note for parents and educators."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 40 pages
  • God's Big Plan
  • Elizabeth F. Caldwell
  • 04 March 2017
  • 1947888064

About the Author: Elizabeth F. Caldwell

Is a well known author, some of his books are a God's Big Epub / fascination for readers like in the God's Big Plan book, this is one of the most wanted Elizabeth F Caldwell author readers around the world.


God's Big Plan[Read] ➱ God's Big Plan ➹ Elizabeth F. Caldwell – Johndore.co.uk The world is full of so many different things animals, plants, foods, languages, people But it might not have been that way if it weren t for God s big planThis vibrant picture book illuminates a new The world is full of so many different things animals, plants, God's Big Epub / foods, languages, people But it might not have been that way if it weren t for God s big planThis vibrant picture book illuminates a new understanding of the story of Babel in Genesis, revealing God s plan for glorious diversity throughout the world God s Big Plan includes a note for parents and educators.

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10 thoughts on “God's Big Plan

  1. Jessica says:

    God s Big Plan is a book that is twisting and distorting a story from the Bible to push a liberal, cultural agenda The premise of the book is the Tower of Babel in Genesis 11 1 9 It starts by talking about how all people were alike, spoke the same language, and lived in the same place The people decided to build a very tall building so they can all stay together God decided he wanted many different kinds of people, so he gave them different languages to speak and the people scattered to othe God s Big Plan is a book that is twisting and distorting a story from the Bible to push a liberal, cultural agenda The premise of the book is the Tower of Babel in Genesis 11 1 9 It starts by talking about how all people were alike, spoke the same language, and lived in the same place The people decided to build a very tall building so they can all stay together God decided he wanted many different kinds of people, so he gave them different languages to speak and the people scattered to other places The part of the book, God s Big Plan, that I really have issues with is the part that states, We came together to worship in many different places and on that page there are pictures of a Buddhist temple, a Christian church, an Islamic mosque, and others This page is clearly indicating that it was God s plan for people to worship whichever gods they choose at whichever temple, church, mosque, etc they see fit On another page there are two men with a baby, on another a child wearing all rainbows, and on yet another page a woman who looks very masculine This could be nothing, but it seems to be the author is encouraging homosexuality I m personally not ok with twisting a Bible story to push a political point of view The fact that this book is labeled a Children s Christian book and promoting the fact that God s purpose was to have many different religions other than Christianity is not ok with me and I feel like I need to warn other parents before you bring this book into your home

  2. Betty says:

    In a retelling of Genesis 11 1 9, after the flood Noah and his descendants all moved to the city of Shinar Here, everyone was alike and they spoke the same language They liked all being the same God looked down on them and said If I do not do something, everyone will be just like everyone else forever God wanted the world to be full of many kinds of people Thus, they were given different languages The people were then dispersed throughout the world God s big plan resulted in the world In a retelling of Genesis 11 1 9, after the flood Noah and his descendants all moved to the city of Shinar Here, everyone was alike and they spoke the same language They liked all being the same God looked down on them and said If I do not do something, everyone will be just like everyone else forever God wanted the world to be full of many kinds of people Thus, they were given different languages The people were then dispersed throughout the world God s big plan resulted in the world now being filled with different languages, different peoples, and different ways of living.I thought this was a beautiful retelling for children to understand the beauty of a diverse world They can grasp the monotony of all being the same and the wonder of experiencing and sharing our differences The illustrations are lovely, the language simple In the back of the book are discussion questions and a note to parents and educators.Some will find the story disturbing as it discards the Biblical story based on the idea that God is punishing the people for wanting to build a tower that reaches to the heavens However, I especially like the retelling in today s climate of divisiveness.Thanks to Flyaway Books for the complimentary review copy Opinions are my own

  3. Vonda says:

    There were definitely red flags when I read this book The author explained, Interpreters throughout history have read the story in a way that presents difference as a problem They believed, incorrectly, that Babel s tower symbolized human pride and challenged God s ruleThrough this lens, diversity is God s punishment for sin God s Big Plan retells the story of Babel based on new scholarship that challenges this negative history of interpretation It offers aaccurate translation of t There were definitely red flags when I read this book The author explained, Interpreters throughout history have read the story in a way that presents difference as a problem They believed, incorrectly, that Babel s tower symbolized human pride and challenged God s ruleThrough this lens, diversity is God s punishment for sin God s Big Plan retells the story of Babel based on new scholarship that challenges this negative history of interpretation It offers aaccurate translation of the original text for a precise reading that isfaithful to the aim of the original storyteller What I would like to know is What is this newly discovered scholarship What is the basis for this newaccurate translation What precipitated the change Why Who was involved in coming to this new interpretation If the author had disclosed this information, I feel like readers would be able to make a better judgment on the context and interpretation This is a glaring omission.In the illustrations, the use of halos around some of the characters seems odd to me I don t quite understand the authors explanation The artist, Katie Yamasaki, has placed halos around the heads of the characters She did this to symbolize their common language and sameness In general, halos symbolize something else entirely I googled the general symbolism just to be sure It says, Typically surrounding a godly or enlightened person, a halo represents holiness Christian artists believed that the halo was symbolic of the light of grace bestowed by God Before the rise of Christianity, pagans used halos to signify not only divine influence but also power, majesty and prominence From the website lope.ca As far as the message of accepting everyone s differences because that was a part of God s plan, I can agree with that We need to respect people of all faith traditions whether we agree with them or not And I do think cultures and peoples are to be celebrated and we can learn things from one another as we share our different experiences But the way to salvation is narrow Jesus is the way to salvation.These opinions are my own I was offered an electronic copy from netgalley

  4. Holly says:

    I really am not sure what to feel about this book It sort of takes the history of Old Testament theology and throws it away The reasoning is detailed in the author s note they interpret the translation of the word babel with another word, balal The message in the book is a positive one, though non Presbyterians may not especially agree with this interpretation of the Tower of Babel story Best for Presbyterian possibly Episcopalian Christian church or private school libraries, public libr I really am not sure what to feel about this book It sort of takes the history of Old Testament theology and throws it away The reasoning is detailed in the author s note they interpret the translation of the word babel with another word, balal The message in the book is a positive one, though non Presbyterians may not especially agree with this interpretation of the Tower of Babel story Best for Presbyterian possibly Episcopalian Christian church or private school libraries, public libraries with big local Presbyterian communities, or public libraries with massive budgets for J 200s NF collections.Given access to a digital ARC by Edelweiss since I am a librarian that orders youth 200s Decided not to buy for my particular library

  5. Andrea says:

    I like the sentiment of this story, that we have so much diversity in this world because that is what God wanted and planned for It s presented in a simple format that kids will be able to pay attention to and enjoy The illustrations felt a little flat to me, but did convey people of a variety of colors, races, cultures, and abilities, thus demonstrating the truly wide variety of people we have on this earth Bonus points to the book for acknowledging that people also observe different religio I like the sentiment of this story, that we have so much diversity in this world because that is what God wanted and planned for It s presented in a simple format that kids will be able to pay attention to and enjoy The illustrations felt a little flat to me, but did convey people of a variety of colors, races, cultures, and abilities, thus demonstrating the truly wide variety of people we have on this earth Bonus points to the book for acknowledging that people also observe different religions and may worship differently I think that part was honestly my favorite.Thank you to the publisher for fulfilling my review request via NetGalley All thoughts and opinions are my own

  6. Shannon says:

    I am not entirely sure how I feel about this book The message is a positive one, but the author has changed the story from the Bible If you read the author s note in the back of the book, the author explains why this was done and again, the message is positive However, I will not be sharing this book, especially with children, as is changing stories from Scripture The illustrations are vibrant and colorful, but it doesn t change the fact that the author has decided to change a story to meet I am not entirely sure how I feel about this book The message is a positive one, but the author has changed the story from the Bible If you read the author s note in the back of the book, the author explains why this was done and again, the message is positive However, I will not be sharing this book, especially with children, as is changing stories from Scripture The illustrations are vibrant and colorful, but it doesn t change the fact that the author has decided to change a story to meet their narrative.Thank you to the publisher, Flyaway Books, for sending me an ARC of this book

  7. Lauren Paletta says:

    A educational story about how God spread people of different languages and appearance throughout the whole world Not only that, but a story that encourages children to accept people who are different because that was God s plan for the world He wanted us all to be different and unique Godsbigplan Netgalley

  8. Jeanie says:

    Shows the diversity of God s world, people and plan I would not call this a religious book as it does not express any biblical theology A Special Thank you to Flyaway Books and Netgalley for the ARC and the opportunity to post an honest review.

  9. Elizabeth Seibel says:

    I want to thank netgalley for giving me a copy of GodsBigPlan to review This is a beautifully illustrated version of the story of the Tower of Babel I like how the author discusses God s plan for the people in relation to the Tower A great early childhood bible story.

  10. Susan Foster says:

    Nope.