The Song of Sarin

!!> Download ➽ The Song of Sarin ➸ Author Stew Magnuson – Johndore.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 432 pages
  • The Song of Sarin
  • Stew Magnuson
  • English
  • 09 July 2018
  • 1401091423

About the Author: Stew Magnuson

Stew Magnuson is the author of The Death of Raymond Yellow Thunder And Other True Stories from the Nebraska Pine Ridge Border Towns, a nonfiction history spanning 130 years in the lives of two communities the white settler towns in Sheridan County, Nebraska, and the Oglala Lakotas of the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota.A native of Omaha and a graduate of the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, Magnuson is a Washington, D.C based journalist and former foreign correspondent who has filed stories from Mali, Japan, Cambodia, Burma, Laos, Thailand, and Indonesia He has traveled or lived in forty six countries, including the Islamic Republic of Mauritania, where he served in the Peace Corps, and Peshawar, Pakistan, where he worked with Afghan refugees in the late 1980s He is the author of The Song of Sarin, a fictional account of the subway nerve gas attack in Tokyo He lives in Arlington, Virginia He is an associate member of the Western Writers of America.And a member of the Committee to Protect Journalists.


The Song of SarinTamara Duffy Spots Her Former Boyfriend On The Steps Leading Down To A Crowded Tokyo Subway Station The 29 Year Old American Follows Him Into A Train Packed With Morning Commuters Aum Shinrikyo Member Siha Walks Down The Steps Of The Station Wearing A Surgical Mask And Gloves, Carrying A Clear Plastic Umbrella In One Hand And Two Bags Of Nerve Gas In The Other Inspector Shin Nomura, Sitting At His Desk At The Tokyo Metropolitan Police Department, Knows Something Bad Is About To Happen, But Is Powerless To Stop It It S March 20, 1995, And Their Lives Are About To Change Forever.

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10 thoughts on “The Song of Sarin

  1. Emily Sorrells says:

    This book was a refreshing break from what I had been reading I love the honestly portrayed characters, and not just the good guys either Yes, Tamara and the detective, Nomura, are amazingly rich and fascinating characters, but I was stuck to the book because of Magnuson s amazing portrayal of the bad guy, Tamara s ex boyfriend and Aum Shinrikyo member, Siha It is Siha who really builds the conflict of the story, at times you are compelled to almost feel bad for him, even though you know This book was a refreshing break from what I had been reading I love the honestly portrayed characters, and not just the good guys either Yes, Tamara and the detective, Nomura, are amazingly rich and fascinating characters, but I was stuck to the book because of Magnuson s amazing portrayal of the bad guy, Tamara s ex boyfriend and Aum Shinrikyo member, Siha It is Siha who really builds the conflict of the story, at times you are compelled to almost feel bad for him, even though you know of the horrific things he has done while working with Aum Shinrikyo.I would definitely recommend this book for anybody interested in Japanese culture as well Magnuson was actually living in Japan at the time of the Sarin attacks, so his fictionalized account of the events seems all thecompelling to me I really enjoyed having one of the characters, Tamara, be a foreigner in Japanese society and was interested in how she perceived it through Western eyes I can easily relate to some of the issues she has with the culture There is a respect, of course, but at the same time a fully encompassing feeling of being an outsider.Having been to Tokyo myself, I appreciated Magnuson s great eye for detail, especially in the subway scenes I felt like I was back on the Ginza Line, looking for my stop, trying to find breathing room in a crowded car full of commuters I can see why the Sarin attacks were so truly frightening Not just because Japan is highly touted as being one of the safest, crime wise, countries in the world, but because of all the places you need to feel safe an underground subway system choked full of people is definitely one of them.Overall a great book Will definitely be reading it again It s been a few weeks since I finished Song of Sarin and I can still vividly remember every detail Wonderful

  2. Jasmine says:

    A five star rating was obvious for me.It was incredibly hard to put down once I started reading it I found myself reading as much as possible and carried it around with me everywhere I went.Magnuson does a phenomenal job of weaving a fictional story with true events He skillfully tells the tale of three people before during and after the true life Japanese sarin gas attacks in 1995 His characters are detailed and the story is thorough He is meticulous with descriptions and the reader is very A five star rating was obvious for me.It was incredibly hard to put down once I started reading it I found myself reading as much as possible and carried it around with me everywhere I went.Magnuson does a phenomenal job of weaving a fictional story with true events He skillfully tells the tale of three people before during and after the true life Japanese sarin gas attacks in 1995 His characters are detailed and the story is thorough He is meticulous with descriptions and the reader is very clearly able to see exactly what the character sees He does a great job of explaining aspects of the Japanese culture to Westerners in a very natural way It s full of richness and suspense that makes you turn the pages as quickly as you can in anticipation.This is a great book and I recommend it

  3. Susan says:

    I have to admit, this is not a book I would normally pick from the shelves simply because of the location and subject matter, but I was curious after reading another nonfiction book by Magnuson However, I was pleasantly surprised to be drawn into the story right from the beginning chapter Magnuson weaves the stories of two victims of the Sarin gassing in the Tokyo subways with the story of one of the cult members and the police detective in charge of the investigation to give us a total view o I have to admit, this is not a book I would normally pick from the shelves simply because of the location and subject matter, but I was curious after reading another nonfiction book by Magnuson However, I was pleasantly surprised to be drawn into the story right from the beginning chapter Magnuson weaves the stories of two victims of the Sarin gassing in the Tokyo subways with the story of one of the cult members and the police detective in charge of the investigation to give us a total view of the disaster I was especially interested in the peak into the inner workings of the cult