Poisoning the Press

[PDF] ❤ Poisoning the Press  ✮ Mark Feldstein – Johndore.co.uk
  • Hardcover
  • 480 pages
  • Poisoning the Press
  • Mark Feldstein
  • English
  • 03 September 2018
  • 0374235309

About the Author: Mark Feldstein

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Poisoning the Press book, this is one of the most wanted Mark Feldstein author readers around the world.


Poisoning the Press VERY GOOD HARDBACK WITH DUSTJACKET

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10 thoughts on “Poisoning the Press

  1. Frances Levy says:

    The academic research that produced this book is astounding A very well written book that teaches us two things Richard Nixon was an even bigger son of a bitch that we thought he was, and so was Jack Anderson.Absolutely fascinating.I used to read the Merry Go Round column as well as Maxine Cheshire s society column now there s a ripe subject for a book in the Washington Post when Drew Pearson wrote it and then Jack Anderson took the reins There was no CNN then If you really wanted to know w The academic research that produced this book is astounding A very well written book that teaches us two things Richard Nixon was an even bigger son of a bitch that we thought he was, and so was Jack Anderson.Absolutely fascinating.I used to read the Merry Go Round column as well as Maxine Cheshire s society column now there s a ripe subject for a book in the Washington Post when Drew Pearson wrote it and then Jack Anderson took the reins There was no CNN then If you really wanted to know what was going on in Washington you read the Merry Go Round and Maxine They got it right about 95% of the time.To learn that Nixon went so far as to seriously consider having Jack Anderson assassinated was a revelation I always thought he was a two faced, sneaky SOB, but mostly with regard to money and power To think he would actually try to have an annoying journalist murdered, though Oh, wait, it s not a crime if the president does it, right, Dick An excellent read, even for those too young to remember Tricky Dick and Jack Anderson But be careful out there G Gordon Liddy is still around, and that is one scary dude

  2. Jen says:

    Fascinating Mark Feldstein reminds the reader of Nixon s endless corruptions and the blame he puts on everyone but himself This blame eventually leads to the plot to kill his long time nemesis in the press, Jack Anderson Anderson is a muckracker who arrived in Washington as an investigative reporter the same time Nixon arrived as a California Congressman Anderson uncovered scandal after scandal that had Nixon in the front and center One such expose earned him a Pulitzer Prize Yet he didn t Fascinating Mark Feldstein reminds the reader of Nixon s endless corruptions and the blame he puts on everyone but himself This blame eventually leads to the plot to kill his long time nemesis in the press, Jack Anderson Anderson is a muckracker who arrived in Washington as an investigative reporter the same time Nixon arrived as a California Congressman Anderson uncovered scandal after scandal that had Nixon in the front and center One such expose earned him a Pulitzer Prize Yet he didn t unearth the scandal that shut Nixon down once and for all For this, his legacy isn t as well known Soon he was lost in the shuffle of investigative reporters and his demise is similar to the scandals he had earlier reported about For the history political buff, this book is a must read I recommend reading this before the Bob Woodward Carl Berstein account in their book All the President s Men Feldstein does a remarkable job of describing who the President s Men were and how they played a role in the Nixon administration and scandals

  3. Phil says:

    If you want to see the antecedents of the Bush crime family, look no further than the pages of this book Tracing a line from Nixon in the 1940s and the Alger Hiss case through to the corruption of ex military officers parroting the talking points of the Pentagon on Faux News, this book covers the history of the corrupting influence of that virulent strain of political slime that is Conservatism The dirty tricks, the bribery, scandal, backstabbing and even murder almost.A wonderfully research If you want to see the antecedents of the Bush crime family, look no further than the pages of this book Tracing a line from Nixon in the 1940s and the Alger Hiss case through to the corruption of ex military officers parroting the talking points of the Pentagon on Faux News, this book covers the history of the corrupting influence of that virulent strain of political slime that is Conservatism The dirty tricks, the bribery, scandal, backstabbing and even murder almost.A wonderfully researched and very well written history of the relationship between the press and politicians, it reads like a thriller It is quite the page turner and you ll have trouble putting it down

  4. Carol Hoenig says:

    I wrote about this disturbing book for The Huffington Post

  5. Converse says:

    Its not every American politician who seriously asks his subordinates to find a way to kill a pesky journalist without getting caught But then not every American politician has the likes of G Gordon Liddy and Howard Hunt on the payrollJack Anderson s interactions with Richard Nixon when back over a decade by the early 1970s His serious journalistic career began when started working with the columnist Drew Pearson in the late 1940s He and Pearson revealed just before the 1960 election thaIts not every American politician who seriously asks his subordinates to find a way to kill a pesky journalist without getting caught But then not every American politician has the likes of G Gordon Liddy and Howard Hunt on the payrollJack Anderson s interactions with Richard Nixon when back over a decade by the early 1970s His serious journalistic career began when started working with the columnist Drew Pearson in the late 1940s He and Pearson revealed just before the 1960 election that Nixon had received money from Howard Hughes, the money being laundered through Nixon s brother DonAnderson took over the column when Pearson died in 1969 His most important exposes were during the Nixon presidency just before Watergate became a major issue Anderson revealed from various sources that the conglomerate ITT had paid 400,000 towards the Republican convention in return for favorable consideration in an anti trust case, that the ITT and the CIA were conspiring to overthrow the government of the Maxist Allende in the South American nation of Chile, and that the Nixon administration had despite congressional bans found ways to support Pakistan during its war with India over Bangledesh becoming an independent nation, separate from Pakistan The latter event, involving the dispatch of a large American fleet to the Bay of Bangledesh, had some prospects of becoming a second Cuban Missile Crisis, in the sense that a dispute over proxy nations could have lead to a second nuclear confrontationBefore thinking of assassination, Nixon did think of some less final ways of dealing with Anderson One of these means was getting the CIA to spy on him, which is apparently illegal For about a month the spying went unnoticed by Anderson, until a neighbor noticed men looking down at the Anderson home from a church parking lot and tipped Anderson off After some delay Anderson was able to determine from license plates that it was the CIA, rather than the numerous other federal agencies who had cause to be displeased with him, was the one doing the spying Once made aware of the spying, the older of Anderson s nine children showed remarkable skill in thwarting the CIA s efforts This event did rather shake my confidence in our nation s spooks Ironically, the Watergate affair was the one major scandle Anderson did little to expose This is especially ironic, because it was apparently Anderson s earlier work which encourage Nixon to order the break in at the Democratic National Committee offices, if only to change the subject Once Watergate became the subject of several official probes by Congressional Committees and special prosecutors, Anderson s column was unable to keep up with the rapidly dissemination ofinformation about the scandalAs a tribune of the people, Jack Anderson had several blemishes He was found trying to bug a hotel room in the 1950s, but escape serious legal trouble due to a suddenly weak memory He took money from some of his sources, in particular Irv Davidson, a lobbyist whose clients mostly seem to have been members of the mafia He also sometimes published stories that were not true, as when he said that Donald Rumsfeld, in an earlier job as an anti poverty czar in the White House, had spent a good deal of money intended for anti poverty efforts in improving his own office Anderson also had a strong homophobic streak, as revealed during a mid 1960s scandal over homosexuals allegedly employed by then Governer Ronald Reagan After the Watergate years, he seems to have rapidly moved away from serious journalism to cashing in on his celebrity A low point was when he was working on a documentary on theExxon Valdezoil spill funding with money from Exxon, which unsurpisingly concluded that sea life was quickly bouncing back from this event This documentary doesn t seem to have been made public, as a revolt by Anderson s journalistic staff convinced him not to continue with the project These flaws contrast oddly with another aspect of Anderson s life, his devout membership in the Mormon church and his decades long marriage to his wife OliviaThe main thing political operatives learned from dealing with Anderson was to follow the nonviolent less extreme aspects of Nixon s media manipulation, but do it better These tactics included devising a daily media message, giving speeches mainly to invited groups of supporters, supporting friendly journalists, and restricting access to administration officials in order to reduce those leeks not authorized by the President They have had remarkable success with these tactics In the Republican party there have been a remarkable succession of people who had personal experience of Nixon s methods, such as Karl Rove, Richard Cheney, and Donald Rumsfeld, who have gone on to use them withfiness The Democrats have been slower to catch up

  6. Todd says:

    I am fascinated by Richard Nixon.The man is straight out of Shakespeare sometimes Iago, sometimes Lear, sometimes in his better, if increasingly rare, moments Prince Hal himself Never Falstaff, though Nobody doubts his brilliance or cunning, but oh, what venality He could never get over the contempt he had for the kinds of people LBJ called the Harvards those golden boys who effortlessly controlled the levers of power and sneered at awkward ladder climbers like Richard Nixon.Mark I am fascinated by Richard Nixon.The man is straight out of Shakespeare sometimes Iago, sometimes Lear, sometimes in his better, if increasingly rare, moments Prince Hal himself Never Falstaff, though Nobody doubts his brilliance or cunning, but oh, what venality He could never get over the contempt he had for the kinds of people LBJ called the Harvards those golden boys who effortlessly controlled the levers of power and sneered at awkward ladder climbers like Richard Nixon.Mark Feldstein s Poisoning the Press pairs Nixon with one of his fiercest critics, muckraking columnist Jack Anderson In Anderson, Nixon hadthan a foe in the media he had someone who was surprisingly like the 37th president himself Like Nixon, Anderson had a ne er do well brother and a fractious relationship with his father like Nixon, Anderson grew fond of a wealthy lifestyle at the expense of his ethics One of Anderson s early gets had to do with payoffs Nixon received from wealthy benefactors Anderson would later sacrifice much of his regard for money Naturally, the two became mortal enemies.Perhaps it was always to be Anderson started off as an assistant to Drew Pearson, the patrician columnist of the Washington Merry Go Round Pearson disliked Nixon Anderson,willing to get into the dirt, took the cue Nixon, a lightning rod during the Eisenhower administration, found himself the subject of investigations, exposes and tidbits in the widely read column.Pearson died in 1969 and the Merry Go Round became Anderson s The same year, Nixon became president and was determined to keep the press at bay or worse Anderson, ever the bulldog, would not let go of the president s leg There was a lot of meat to be had, and it infuriated Nixon.I thought I knew a lot about the 37th president, but there was much in Feldstein s book that surprised me Anderson broke a 1971 story about administration overtures to Pakistan, including a move by the Seventh Fleet into the Bay of Bengal, that could have led to World War III, thanks to India s friendship with the USSR If the Russians had gotten itchy trigger fingers, We will be finished, the toadying Henry Kissinger told the president Kissinger does not come off well, something to keep in mind, since he s still around and apparently still advising presidents The Anderson Papers, which came out not long after the Pentagon Papers, helped win Anderson a Pulitzer.He wasn t done Every day he had something to embarrass the president, whether major he uncovered funds that conglomerate ITT had given Nixon or minor The leaks to the well connected Anderson from administration insiders, and all the loose money flowing to the president and his re election campaign, became part and parcel of Watergate The Plumbers, after all, were named because they were supposed to plug leaks Ironically, Watergate was a story Anderson didn t get In fact, he actually knew about the DNC break in beforehand, but couldn t nail it down and decided it was a bum tip Amazingly, Anderson ran into Watergate burglar Frank Sturgis and his colleagues in the airport just hours before the crime, but didn t have the time to ask what they were doing in town Eventually the scandal led to his decline Who needed Jack Anderson when every paper and TV network were hiring Woodwards and Bernsteins One of Anderson s top men, Brit Hume, soon jumped to ABC he s now at Fox News Though the Merry Go Round was still a much read column, Anderson couldn t readjust to new times, making Nixonian mountains out of Carter administration molehills and then finding himself weakened during the Reagan years.Meanwhile, Nixon was rehabilitating his image though he never could leave behind the pettiness of his character Hunter S Thompson s obituary of Nixon, coming after a pageant of tributes to the man, was a sobering corrective And Anderson He never could recover his Nixon era fame and died in 2005.Feldstein s book is full of jaw droppers, whether about Nixon or Anderson s pursuit of him At times I wondered if he was a little tough on both his protagonists I mean, Nixon could be shrewd and even thoughtful as well as diabolical, and Anderson, as Feldstein shows, did have an occasional sense of humor to go along with his indefatigable drive but when you ve got Nixon underlings Charles Colson, Howard Hunt and G Gordon Liddy considering an assassination of Anderson on Nixon s nod, well, maybe he wasn t tough enough.Feldstein is an able writer Poisoning the Press sometimes reads like a thriller, though one devoid of heroes The book was released in 2010 and seems evenrelevant these days, a time when the country is fiercely divided and another president is railing about leaks coming from within his administration I wonder what Jack Anderson in his prime would make of it all

  7. Kusaimamekirai says:

    This is a fascinating look at two men, president Richard Nixon and reporter Jack Anderson, who shared an adversarial and toxic relationship for thirty years This relationship would have far reaching consequences not only for the lives of these men but for the country as a whole even to this day While many people today probably are unaware of Jack Anderson he was during the 60 s and 70 s the preeminent investigative journalist in America As such, he spent a large amount of time hounding, hara This is a fascinating look at two men, president Richard Nixon and reporter Jack Anderson, who shared an adversarial and toxic relationship for thirty years This relationship would have far reaching consequences not only for the lives of these men but for the country as a whole even to this day While many people today probably are unaware of Jack Anderson he was during the 60 s and 70 s the preeminent investigative journalist in America As such, he spent a large amount of time hounding, harassing, and exposing the criminal actions of congressman and later president Nixon The author makes a very interesting chicken or the egg case here that rather than temper his already deeply secretive nature, Anderson s columns actually pushed Nixon to new heights of paranoia and criminality In hindsight it is hard to quantify how much cause and effect these two men had on each other but undoubtedly it led to very murky and illicit behavior from both of them For those with even a passing knowledge of Nixon, his profanity laced outbursts are well known What is perhaps less known is by the time of Watergate, Nixon s level of hatred for Anderson was such that he was actively in the planning stages with his staff about how to murder him That this didn t happen seems to be solely the timing of Watergate bringing him down before he could This is not to say Anderson was a noble soul He would employ questionable methods bribery, bugging, blackmail using questionable men Latin American dictators, mobsters to get the information he needed while arguing that dishonourable means sometimes yielded necessary and honourable results Ironically, this is similar to Nixon s rationale for his own actions It led me to wonder if there is a line in either journalism or government that should never be crossed If a reporter s illegal wiretapping, leaking, and bribery lead to preventing illegal bombing in Laos or Cambodia is it justified If the director of the FBI or president does the same in the name of what he she believes is vital to protect America is it justified Often the answers to these questions seem to depend on what side of the political spectrum we inhabit but partisanship aside, it seems to be much of the same thing without a clear answer What this book makes clear is that neither man had any claim to a moral high road It was a time of vicious attacks being a necessary evil to achieve goals each believed was for the good of the country That this set the wheels in motion for the distrustful and bitter relationship between government and the press even today is perhaps its legacy s greatest tragedy

  8. david-baptiste says:

    Excellent portrayal of the decades long feud war between Tricky Dick Nixon and the scoop snoop supreme jack Anderson for myself a fascinating read as i had not known the extent of the mutual enmity involvement of the two men dating back to the late 1940 s and the effects sometimes inadvertntly postive thatAnderson had on Nixon s various election campaigns in California Congress Senate inthe 1940 s governorship race lost in 1962 and nationally as Vice President under Eisenhower and Excellent portrayal of the decades long feud war between Tricky Dick Nixon and the scoop snoop supreme jack Anderson for myself a fascinating read as i had not known the extent of the mutual enmity involvement of the two men dating back to the late 1940 s and the effects sometimes inadvertntly postive thatAnderson had on Nixon s various election campaigns in California Congress Senate inthe 1940 s governorship race lost in 1962 and nationally as Vice President under Eisenhower and Presiendt from 1968 to Watergate the book pulls no punches in its portrayal of both men Anderson doesn t erge, isnt shown as, a completely good guy either his use of dubious tactic methods in the late Fifties early Sixties actual inspired some of Nixon s own most sleazy tricks excellent insights in to the dirty paranoid role that homophobia played not only in the Nixon camp but also in many of Anderson s own campaigns against Nixon and his cohorts the famous assertions re Erlichman and Haldeman as well as an expose of some of Reagan s advisors in California in the 1960 s derailing Regan s rise to supreme power for a decade plus the overall horrific and appalling, trash sleazy, down right dirty sometimes your hands feel like they need washing after reading some pages revelations in the book balanced by many truly hilarious bizarre incidents let alone the ways in which Nixon and Anderson in some ways mirrored each other, as enemies often do a good read, impeccably researched out of which no one comes out clean the boo is also very good re Nixon s periopds of alcoholism extreme depression abuse of his family, who nearly left him in the Sixties and also re Anderson s decline both as news reporter and human being later in life, though at the end he redeems himself somewhat, unlike nixon and his forced and media abetted return as a great statesman i give it three and half stars

  9. Riley says:

    This book is a good reminder of just how dangerous Richard Nixon really was I also learned a lot about Jack Anderson, a largely forgotten media figure who was in his day the nation s preeminent investigative reporter.Whenever I read about abuses by the FBI and CIA, I m always struck by how absurd and incompetent they often are It is always important to remember, though, that they are also very, very serious things Those thoughts came to mind for me reading about the Nixon administration s plo This book is a good reminder of just how dangerous Richard Nixon really was I also learned a lot about Jack Anderson, a largely forgotten media figure who was in his day the nation s preeminent investigative reporter.Whenever I read about abuses by the FBI and CIA, I m always struck by how absurd and incompetent they often are It is always important to remember, though, that they are also very, very serious things Those thoughts came to mind for me reading about the Nixon administration s plots to assassinate Anderson no joke As author Mark Feldstein writes To be sure, the White House plot to assassinate Anderson was ultimately aborted and the conspirators were soon caught breaking into the Watergate building But the final outcome could easily have been very different Anderson, for one, believes that it was just a fluke that he wasn t murdered, and then only because the CIA failed to trust Nixon s men with the necessary toxins As always, theresponsibility went back to the man at the top One day we ll get them, President Nixon told disgraced aide Charles Colson, we ll get them on the ground where we want them And we ll stick out heels in, step on them hard and twist If not for bad luck at the Watergate complex, Nixon s second term might well have contained the kind of lethal revenge his men plotted against Jack Anderson and no one but the conspirators themselves might ever have known about it

  10. April Helms says:

    A great read for history buffs although you might want a comic chaser afterward It s an interesting and well written account of the backgrounds and relationship between former president Richard Nixon and muckracker columnist Jack Anderson To say it was antagonistic would be an understatement The two men hated each other with a passion there is a whole chapter devoted to how Nixon asked some of his Plumbers about murdering him The writing can be funny the whole bit about the CIA trying to A great read for history buffs although you might want a comic chaser afterward It s an interesting and well written account of the backgrounds and relationship between former president Richard Nixon and muckracker columnist Jack Anderson To say it was antagonistic would be an understatement The two men hated each other with a passion there is a whole chapter devoted to how Nixon asked some of his Plumbers about murdering him The writing can be funny the whole bit about the CIA trying to spy on Anderson, and what Anderson and his family did when they found out, made me crack up laughing out loud There are other parts that made me shake my head in disgust at both parties Of course, the conclusion winds up being the Watergate Scandal, which, in its way, wound up ruining the careers of both men It s interesting and chilling how Nixon s policies on press handling have impacted White House policy even today