Welsh Fairy Tales

[Download] ➵ Welsh Fairy Tales ➾ William Elliot Griffis – Johndore.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 114 pages
  • Welsh Fairy Tales
  • William Elliot Griffis
  • English
  • 19 November 2019
  • 1151290572

About the Author: William Elliot Griffis

American orientalist, Congregational minister, lecturer.Griffis was an English and Latin language tutor for Tar Kusakabe, a young samurai from the province of Echizen In September 1870 Griffis was invited to Japan to organize schools along modern lines.


Welsh Fairy TalesGeneral Books Publication Date Original Publication Date Original Publisher Thomas Y Crowell Co Subjects Fairy Tales Fiction Fantasy General Fiction Fantasy Historical Fiction Fantasy Short Stories Fiction Fairy Tales, Folklore

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10 thoughts on “Welsh Fairy Tales

  1. Set says:

    The Welsh Fairy Tales is a very interesting and entertaining book with some of the oldest fairy tales to have been recorded These tales have it all Merlin, Arthur, magic, dragons, damsels, fairies, elves, witches, mermaids, knights, etc But I must say that all these fairies that bet on their names always fall on their hubris And I learned that fairies don t like to be struck which is practically a nudge or touch and they don t like iron.

  2. Michael says:

    Originally published in 1857, Griffis work was meant to be a semi scholarly review of Welsh mythological beings such as fairies and the like Griffis collected stories, beliefs and sightings from locals while the Celtic belief in such mythological beings was still extant I enjoyed comparing these beliefs with the Irish gaelic versions.

  3. Lauren says:

    I made it 60% of the way through and just could not get into the stories.

  4. Sherry Roit says:

    Tales It s a bit strange to me, having this partly like the older tales, yet modern ideas and language cut into it.

  5. Tugce Bahceci says:

    Feelslike a boring lecture on welsh fair tales.

  6. Rebecca says:

    Delightfully old fashioned Unashamed pro Welsh sentiment Good times.

  7. Perry Whitford says:

    The author of this retold collection of Welsh fairy tales was an American of Welsh ancestry In his introduction he pointedly gives thanks to those inheritances from the world of imagination, for which the Cymric Land was famous, even before the days of either Anglo Saxon or Norman Griffis clearly targeted this book young readers of Welsh lineage, to foster their interest and make them proud of the cultural legacy of their land This explains a few narrative interventions of this type Now at The author of this retold collection of Welsh fairy tales was an American of Welsh ancestry In his introduction he pointedly gives thanks to those inheritances from the world of imagination, for which the Cymric Land was famous, even before the days of either Anglo Saxon or Norman Griffis clearly targeted this book young readers of Welsh lineage, to foster their interest and make them proud of the cultural legacy of their land This explains a few narrative interventions of this type Now at Bettws y Coed that pretty place which has a name that sounds so funny to us Americans and suggests a girl named Betty the Co ed at college It also explains why his tale introducing Saint David focuses on the patrons invention of cheese on toast as much as anything else This is followed by The Great Red Dragon of Wales , which retells the myth of the young Merlin s trick and prophesy, where the waring red and white serpents he conjured up represented the Cymric and Saxon antagonists Many of the stories are taken direct from the ancient Mabinogian, loosely translated as The Young Folks Treasury of Cymric Stories. They variously feature the playful fairy Puck and his fair, consort Queen Mab.Everyone knows that the Welsh love music, a tradition highlighted wittily in The Golden Harp , where an atrocious singer is given an irresistible gift by a fairy.Griffis is keen to point out just how much Welsh men love their women, yet no less than three of the stories tell of how fairy maidens agree to marry human men on the condition that their husbands do not strike them, only for the men to fail each time, albeit by accident.Back to the theme of pride in the national heritage, Griffis boldly asserts that Cornwall is, in soul, a part of Wales , a point stressed in a few of the stories, which is historically true.Also historically true or at least as true as any other interpretation is the tradition that suggests that King Arthur was a Welsh monarch A couple of stories reflect that.An engagingly written collection which aims to educate, clarify and entertain in equal measure

  8. Anwen says:

    This is a strange little book Griffis, an American of Welsh decent, has evidently heard much of Wales, but has not entirely grasped the meaning of everything so heard There are some glaring errors here in names, meanings and history His borrowing of Shakespeare s Puck is annoying, as is his constant references to the Welshery To anyone growing up in Wales, most of the tales are familiar, though there were one or two which were new to me in association with Wales, but which are common trope This is a strange little book Griffis, an American of Welsh decent, has evidently heard much of Wales, but has not entirely grasped the meaning of everything so heard There are some glaring errors here in names, meanings and history His borrowing of Shakespeare s Puck is annoying, as is his constant references to the Welshery To anyone growing up in Wales, most of the tales are familiar, though there were one or two which were new to me in association with Wales, but which are common tropes elsewhere in the UK The book is evidently aimed at children, but the political commentary is out of place in such a collection There are much better introductions to Welsh lore out there A curiosity, but that is all

  9. CaroleHeidi says:

    I usually enjoy traditional Fairy tales, even when they re a bit weird and stilted but this collection was dire.I know it was written a long time ago but the language was dull and the random modern comparisons Griffis used were jarring and out of place.I struggled my way through stubbornly but there was very little enjoyment to be had I knew several of the stories from living near to Wales all of my life and these retellings were far from the best I ve heard.I certainly won t be rushing to r I usually enjoy traditional Fairy tales, even when they re a bit weird and stilted but this collection was dire.I know it was written a long time ago but the language was dull and the random modern comparisons Griffis used were jarring and out of place.I struggled my way through stubbornly but there was very little enjoyment to be had I knew several of the stories from living near to Wales all of my life and these retellings were far from the best I ve heard.I certainly won t be rushing to recommend it to anyone, luckily it was free

  10. Eleri Jenkins says:

    I found the first few stories interesting to read however theI read I found the stories became repetitive I was also disappointed to note a few errors namely the spelling of eisteddfod Whilst errors are to be expected in a book ebook to find such a word as Eisteddfod, that is integral to Welsh history, misspelt was shame.I personally think it is a book where it is best to read only 2 or three tales at a time.